Intense Agitation (on Time to Get Some Things Straight by John Repp; Black Poem by Gary Copeland Lilley; The Making of Collateral Beauty by Mark Yakich; The Invention of Fiction by Rick Bursky;Elegy and Collapse by Patty Paine; Coming to Flood by Sebastian Matthews; Leave Time by Jeff Worley; A House That Falls by Sean Nevin; Daphne and Jim: A Choose-Your-Own-Adventure Biography in Verse by Laurel Snyder; Hard Rain by Tony Hoagland; Dusk Outside the Braille Press by Paul Hostovsky; One by Diane Kerr; Carmina Detroit by Dawn McDuffie; Fern-Texts by Reginald Gibbons; First Things to Hand by Robert Pinsky; and The Packing House Cantata by William Trowbridge)

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

on Ralph Ellison: A Biography by Arnold Rampersad

Myles Weber’s literary criticism appears frequently in The Georgia Review and many other journals, including New England Review, Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review, Salmagundi, and Michigan Quarterly Review. Associate professor of English at Winona State University in Minnesota, Weber is the author of Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish (University of Georgia Press, 2005) and Middlebrow Annoyances: American Drama in the 21st Century (Gival Press, 2003).

No Place Like Home (on The Woman in the Woods: Linked Stories by Ann Joslin Williams; You Won’t Remember This: Stories by Kate Blackwell; Thoreau’s Laundry by Ann Harleman; The View From Castle Rock: Stories by Alice Munro)

Vision and Virtuosity (on Half/Mask by Roger Mitchell; Escaping the House of Certainty by Susan Ludvigson; My Brother Is Getting Arrested Again by Daisy Fried; Wind in a Box by Terrance Hayes; and This Clumsy Living by Bob Hicok)

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

The Pastor’s Wife Considers Her Fifty-Seventh Birthday

Nola Garrett’s second book, The Pastor’s Wife Considers Pinball, was published by Mayapple Press in 2013. Her first, The Dynamite Maker’s Mistress (Wordtech Communications, 2009) is a collection of twenty-seven variations on the sestina form. She writes a monthly blog for Autumn House Press and is Faculty Emerita of Edinboro University of Pennsylvania.

Yellow House

Sydney Lea’s thirteenth collection of poems, Here, is forthcoming from Four Way Books next year. Also due in 2018, from Vermont’s Green Writers Press, are Lea’s collected newspaper columns from his years as Vermont poet laureate, News That Stay News: Lyric and Everyday Life, his, and a re-issue of his collaborative book of essays with former Delaware poet laureate Fleda Brown, Growing Old in Poetry: Two Poets, Two Lives.

A Hand Is Shaped for What It Holds or Makes

Jane Hirshfield’s most recent books are The Beauty (Knopf, 2015), longlisted for the National Book Award in Poetry, and Ten Windows: How Great Poems Transform the World (Knopf, 2015), winner of the Northern California Book Award. A chancellor emerita of the Academy of American Poets, Hirshfield has had work in the New Yorker, the Atlantic, the Times Literary Supplement, the New York Review of Books, and eight editions of The Best American Poetry.

A Fable Containing a Reflection the Size of a Match Head in Its Pupil

Kevin Brockmeier is the author of nine books, including The Ghost Variations: One Hundred Stories (Pantheon, 2020), from which the three stories in this issue are taken. Some of his earlier contributions to The Georgia Review were reprinted in the Best American Short Stories and O. Henry Prize Stories anthologies. His work has been translated into eighteen languages. He teaches frequently at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and lives in Little Rock, Arkansas, where he was raised.

Signed On & Tool

Albert Goldbarth is the author of more than twenty-five books of poetry, most recently Selfish (2015), Everyday People (2012), and The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems, 1972–2007 (2007), all from Graywolf Press. He has twice won the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.