Letter to Hugo from Athens: An Introduction

Stephen Corey joined the staff of The Georgia Review in 1983 as assistant editor and subsequently has served as associate editor, acting editor, and, since 2008, editor. His most recent book is Startled at the Big Sound: Essays Personal, Literary, and Cultural (Mercer University Press, 2017); he has also published nine collections of poems, among them There Is No Finished World (White Pine Press) and Synchronized Swimming (Livingston Press); his individual poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in dozens of periodicals; and he has coedited three books in as many genres, including (with Warren Slesinger) Spreading the Word: Editors on Poetry (The Bench Press). Over the past thirty-five years he has served as poet-in-residence or visiting poet/editor for numerous writing programs, conferences, and other literary gatherings, and he is currently a member of the core faculty for the low-residency MFA program at Reinhardt University. Born in Buffalo and reared in Jamestown, New York, Stephen Corey holds BA and MA degrees from Harpur College (now Binghamton University) and a PhD from the University of Florida.

Rider

Light Pink Octagon

The Color of Darkness

“Even Sincerity”: On the Viability of the Self in Contemporary Poetry (on One Kind of Everything: Poem and Person in Contemporary America by Dan Chiasson; Dark Horses: Poets on Overlooked Poems by Joy Katz and Kevin Prufer; and American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics by Claudia Rankine and Lisa Sewell)

Kevin Clark’s several books of poems include the forthcoming The Consecrations (Stephen F. Austin State University Press, 2021). His first collection, In the Evening of No Warning (New Issues Poetry and Prose, 2002), earned a grant from the Academy of American Poets, and his second, Self-Portrait with Expletives (2010), won the Pleiades Press prize. His poetry appears in the Southern Review, Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner, Iowa Review, Poetry Northwest, Gulf Coast, and Crazyhorse. A regular critic for The Georgia Review, he’s also published essays in the Southern Review, Papers on Language and Literature, and Contemporary Literary Criticism. He teaches at the Rainier Writing Workshop. 

Where Does the Poetry Go? (on Time Is a Parlor Trick and Other Poems by Doyle D. Turner; Falling into Velázquez by Mary Kaiser; Contents of a Minute by Josephine Jacobsen; A Little White Shadow by Mary Ruefle; The Reindeer Camps by Barton Sutter; The Preacher by Gerald Stern; Turkish Pears in August: Twenty-Four Ramages by Robert Bly; Only on This Planet by John Graber; and A Word for It by Warren Slesinger)

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

American Theater Watch, 2007–2008

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.

Conjugations

David Swanger has published four books of poetry, two chapbooks, and poems in various anthologies and journals. His awards include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the California Arts Council. His most recent book, Wayne’s College of Beauty (2006), won the John Ciardi Poetry Prize.

Memory and Helix: What Comes to Us from the Past