The Last Noël (on The Letters of Noël Coward, edited by Barry Day)

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.

Memoirs on Our Mind (on I’ve Heard the Vultures Singing: Field Notes on Poetry, Illness, and Nature by Lucia Perillo; Room for Doubt by Wendy Lesser; Learning to Fly: A Writer’s Memoir by Mary Lee Settle; Kinfolks: Falling Off the Family Tree: The Search for My Melungeon Ancestors by Lisa Alther; Bigger than Life: A Murder, a Memoir by Dinah Lenney; and Just Breathe Normally by Peggy Shumaker)

Edward Butscher’s poetry and criticism have appeared in numerous literary journals and publications, including the Saturday Review of Literature, Newsday, and the American Book Review. In 1976 he published the first biography of Sylvia Plath, and in 1988 his biography Conrad Aiken: Poet of White Horse Vale won the Poetry Society of America’s Melville Cane Award.

Just How New Is the Terror Paradigm? (on The Terror Dream: Fear and Fantasy in Post-9/11 America by Susan Faludi; The End of America: Letter of Warning to a Young Patriot by Naomi Wolf; Takeover: The Return of the Imperial Presidency and the Subversion of American Democracy by Charlie Savage; The Terror Presidency: Law and Judgment Inside the Bush Administration by Jack Goldsmith; and Monstering: Inside America’s Policy of Secret Interrogations and Torture in the Terror War by Tara McElvey)

Anis Shivani is the author of My Tranquil War and Other Poems (NYQ Books, 2012), The Fifth Lash and Other Stories (C&R Press, 2012), Against the Workshop: Provocations, Polemics, Controversies (Texas Review Press, 2011), and Anatolia and Other Stories (Black Lawrence Press, 2009). Recent work appears in Southwest Review, Boston Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, Threepenny Review, Green Mountains Review, Harvard Review, and elsewhere.

Keeping Company (on Quote Poet Unquote: Contemporary Quotations on Poets and Poetry, edited by Dennis O’Driscoll; A Time in Xanadu by Lars Gustafsson, translated by John Irons; Yellowrocket by Todd Boss; The Invention of the Kaleidoscope by Paisley Rekdal; In Praise of Aunts by M. R. Peacocke; National Anthem by Kevin Prufer; Want by Rick Barot; and Glory River by David Huddle)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Conjugations

David Swanger has published four books of poetry, two chapbooks, and poems in various anthologies and journals. His awards include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the California Arts Council. His most recent book, Wayne’s College of Beauty (2006), won the John Ciardi Poetry Prize.

No Shade Ever

George Singleton has published over three hundred stories in literary journals and magazines such as The Georgia Review, the Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s Magazine, One Story, the Southern Review, and Zoetrope. His eighth collection, Staff Picks, will be available in March 2019 from Yellow Shoe Fiction. A Guggenheim Fellow and a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, Singleton teaches in the English department at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

What We Know Is Not What We Feel

Julie Suk is the author of five volumes of poetry and is co-editor of Bear Crossings, an anthology of North American poets. Her most recent book, Lie Down With Me: New and Selected Poems, was published in 2011 by Autumn House Press, and her work is forthcoming in the Cimarron Review, Great River Review, and Southern Poetry Review.

London & a Friend

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

One Time