True Heart

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Finches or Sparrows

Andrea Hollander’s first published poem appeared in the Winter 1982 issue of The Georgia Review. Her first full-length poetry collection won the 1993 Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize; her fourth was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and creative nonfiction) and two fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. After living in the woods of the Arkansas Ozarks for thirty-five years, she moved to downtown Portland, Oregon, in 2011.

Fig & The Barricade

LaWanda Walters is the author of a forthcoming book of poems, Light Is the Odalisque, selected by Pamela Uschuk and William Pitt Root for the Silver Concho Series at Press 53. Her “Goodness in Mississippi,” originally published in The Georgia Review (Winter 2013) was chosen by Sherman Alexie for Best American Poetry 2015.

A Lesser Sonata

Marjorie Sandor’s forthcoming memoir, The Late Interiors: A Life Under Construction (Arcade/Skyhorse Publishing), will be her fourth book. Her linked story collection, Portrait of My Mother, Who Posed Nude in Wartime (Sarabande, 2003), followed A Night of Music (Ecco, 1989) and won the National Jewish Book Award in Fiction; eight of her stories have appeared in GR. Sandor’s volume of essays The Night Gardener: A Search for Home (Lyons Press, 1999) won the 2000 Oregon Book Award for Literary Nonfiction, and her work has appeared in the Best American Short Stories and Pushcart Prize anthologies, among others. Sandor directs the MFA program in creative writing at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

The Wind

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

on Notes from No Man’s Land by Eula Biss

on Collected Poems by Ciaran Carson

Craig Morgan Teicher is the author of several books, including The Trembling Answers (BOA Editions, 2017), which won the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize from the Academy of American Poets, and the essay collection We Begin in Gladness: How Poets Progress (Graywolf, 2018).

How Well We Know So Little: The Sequence in Post-Postmodern Poetry (on Katie Ford’s Colosseum; Christopher Buckley’s Modern History: Prose Poems 1987–2007; and Rita Dove’s Sonata Mulattica)

Kevin Clark’s several books of poems include the forthcoming The Consecrations (Stephen F. Austin State University Press, 2021). His first collection, In the Evening of No Warning (New Issues Poetry and Prose, 2002), earned a grant from the Academy of American Poets, and his second, Self-Portrait with Expletives (2010), won the Pleiades Press prize. His poetry appears in the Southern Review, Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner, Iowa Review, Poetry Northwest, Gulf Coast, and Crazyhorse. A regular critic for The Georgia Review, he’s also published essays in the Southern Review, Papers on Language and Literature, and Contemporary Literary Criticism. He teaches at the Rainier Writing Workshop. 

Novellas for the New Millennium (on Phillip Lopate’s Two Marriages; Patrick Michael Finn’s A Martyr for Suzy Kosasovich; and William H. Gass’s Cartesian Sonata and Other Novellas)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.