Flannery Fever (on Flannery: A Life of Flannery O’Connor by Brad Gooch; Critical Companion to Flannery O’Connor: A Literary Reference to Her Life and Work by Connie Ann Kirk; and A Literary Guide to Flannery O’Connor’s Georgia by Sarah Gordon)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

Rome Obsession (on The Seven Hills of Rome: A Geological Tour of the Eternal City by Grant Heiken, Renato Funicello, and Donatella De Rita; The History of Rome, Books 1-5 by Livy, translated by Valerie M. Warrior; Rome and Environs: An Archaeological Guide by Filippo Coarelli; The Roman Triumph by Mary Beard; Ancient Rome on Five Denarii a Day by Philip Matyszak; Basilica: The Splendor and the Scandal: Building St. Peter’s by R. A. Scotti; Satyr Square: A Year, A Life in Rome by Leonard Barkan; Four Seasons in Rome: On Twins, Insomnia, and the Biggest Funeral in the History of the World by Anthony Doerr; Blue Guide: Rome by Alta Macadam; and Not Built in a Day: Exploring the Architecture of Rome by George H. Sullivan)

What We Notice, What We Know (on In the Mind’s Eye: Essays across the Animate World by Elizabeth Dodd; Walking the Wrack Line: On Tidal Shifts and What Remains by Barbara Hurd; and Seven Notebooks: Poems by Campbell McGrath)

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

Survival: A Guide

Cleopatra Mathis, author of seven books of poems, has seen her work appear widely in anthologies, magazines, and journals, including the New Yorker, Poetry, Best American Poetry, TriQuarterly, The Made Thing: An Anthology of Contemporary Southern Poetry, and The Extraordinary Tide: Poetry by American Women. She has been the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts grants, the Jane Kenyon Award, the Peter I. B. Lavan Younger Poets Award, two Pushcart Prizes, and the Robert Frost Award.

Volunteer

David Huddle taught at the University of Vermont for thirty-eight years, and he continues to teach at the Bread Loaf School of English. His most recent books are Dream Sender, a poetry collection (LSU Press, 2015), and My Immaculate Assassin, a novel (Tupelo Press, 2016). In 2019 his new novel Hazel will be published by Tupelo, and his new poetry collection, My Surly Heart, by LSU.

Rock-a-Bye

Alice Friman’s seventh collection of poetry is Blood Weather, forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press in 2019. She’s the winner of a Pushcart Prize and is included in Best American Poetry. New work is forthcoming in PloughsharesPlume, Shenandoah, Western Humanities Review, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was poet-in-residence at Georgia College and State University.

Where I Live

Maxine Kumin’s seventeenth poetry collection, Where I Live: New and Selected Poems 1990–2010 (W. W. Norton, 2010), won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in 2011. Kumin’s other awards include the Pulitzer Prize, the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Poets’ Prize, and the Harvard Arts and Robert Frost medals. A former United States poet laureate, Kumin lives with her husband on a farm in the Mink Hills of New Hampshire, where they have raised horses for forty years and enjoyed the companionship of several rescued dogs.

Dr. Deneau’s Punishment

Mandala on a Walking Stick

Margaret Gibson is the current poet laureate of Connecticut and the author of twelve books of poems, all from Louisiana State University Press, most recently Not Hearing the Wood Thrush (2018) and The Glass Globe (forthcoming in 2021), as well as a memoir, The Prodigal Daughter (University of Missouri Press, 2008). The Vigil (1993) was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry; Broken Cup (2016) was a finalist for the Poets’ Prize, and its title poem won a Pushcart Prize that year. Gibson is professor emerita at the University of Connecticut.