I Feel Like Being Nice Today

George Singleton has published over three hundred stories in literary journals and magazines such as The Georgia Review, the Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s Magazine, One Story, the Southern Review, and Zoetrope. His eighth collection, Staff Picks, will be available in March 2019 from Yellow Shoe Fiction. A Guggenheim Fellow and a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, Singleton teaches in the English department at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

The Shield of the Norns

Four Cats and the Pathetic Fallacy

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

O Taste and See

On the Border

Barry Lopez’s essays and fiction have been appearing in The Georgia Review since 1993; he was the keynote speaker at our third annual Earth Day Program in 2011, and for this year’s eleventh edition he will be our first repeat presenter. His Of Wolves and Men (1978) won the John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing and was a finalist for the National Book Award—which his Arctic Dreams (1986) won. Lopez’s numerous short-story collections include Outside (Trinity University Press, 2015) and Resistance (Vintage, 2004); also among his more than a dozen volumes are the novella-length fable Crow and Weasel (1990) and (with Debra Gwartney) Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape (Trinity University Press, 2006). A world traveler to more than seventy countries, Barry Lopez has lived for decades on the upper McKenzie River in Oregon.

on Temper by Beth Bachmann

on The Boatloads by Dan Albergotti

Siân Griffiths directs the creative writing program at Weber State University. Her work has appeared in Fifth Wednesday Journal, Ninth Letter, the Rumpus, Quarterly West, and many other publications. Her first novel, Borrowed Horses (New Rivers Press, 2013), was a semi-finalist for the 2014 VCU Cabell First Novelist Award.

Hard Books (on Jack Gilbert’s The Dance Most of All; April Bernard’s Romanticism; W. S. Merwin’s The Shadow of Sirius; Jim Harrison’s In Search of Small Gods; Nina Cassian’s Continuum; D. Nurkse’s The Border Kingdom: Poems; and Lucia Perillo’s Inseminating the Elephant)

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

Like Tap-Dancing about Architecture (on Reading Dance: A Gathering of Memoirs, Reportage, Criticism, Profiles, Interviews, and Some Uncategorizable Extras, edited by Robert Gottlieb; Nancy Goldner’s Balanchine Variations; Akim Volynsky’s Ballet’s Magic Kingdom: Selected Writings on Dance in Russia, 1911–1925, translated and edited by Stanley J. Rabinowitz; and Jane Goldberg’s Shoot Me While I’m Happy: Memories from the Tap Goddess of the Lower East Side)