Babel

Robert Wrigley, Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Idaho, lives in the high-mountain woods near Moscow. His eleventh and most recent book of poems is Box (Penguin, 2017).

Unnaming

Sydney Lea’s thirteenth collection of poems, Here, is forthcoming from Four Way Books next year. Also due in 2018, from Vermont’s Green Writers Press, are Lea’s collected newspaper columns from his years as Vermont poet laureate, News That Stay News: Lyric and Everyday Life, his, and a re-issue of his collaborative book of essays with former Delaware poet laureate Fleda Brown, Growing Old in Poetry: Two Poets, Two Lives.

Watching My Mother Take Her Last Breath

Leon Stokesbury’s Autumn Rhythm: New and Selected Poems was awarded the Poet’s Prize from the University of Arkansas Press in 1997. He teaches in the creative writing program at Georgia State University and is completing his fourth collection, “I Never Minded Standing in the Rain,” which will include his poem in this issue.

Special Collections: Girl with Canebrake Rattlesnake

R. T. Smith is writer-in-residence at Washington and Lee University, where he edits Shenandoah. The latest of his many books are Outlaw Style: Poems (University of Arkansas Press, 2007) and a collection of stories, The Calaboose Epistles (Iris Press, 2009). His work has been reprinted in such notable anthologies as Best American Poetry, Best American Short Stories, and the Pushcart Prize.

Listening and Speaking

Ellen Wilbur’s stories have been published widely in such journals as the Iowa Review and New Letters, and other new work is forthcoming in Yale Review and Harvard Review. Wilbur lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she teaches at the Shady Hill School.

A Dark Light in the West: Racism and Reconciliation

Barry Lopez’s essays and fiction have been appearing in The Georgia Review since 1993; he was the keynote speaker at our third annual Earth Day Program in 2011, and for this year’s eleventh edition he will be our first repeat presenter. His Of Wolves and Men (1978) won the John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing and was a finalist for the National Book Award—which his Arctic Dreams (1986) won. Lopez’s numerous short-story collections include Outside (Trinity University Press, 2015) and Resistance (Vintage, 2004); also among his more than a dozen volumes are the novella-length fable Crow and Weasel (1990) and (with Debra Gwartney) Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape (Trinity University Press, 2006). A world traveler to more than seventy countries, Barry Lopez has lived for decades on the upper McKenzie River in Oregon.

Raymond Andrews and the Welcome Table

Judy Long is an editor and publicist with more than two decades of experience in bookselling and publishing. She owns Byhalia Media, a book marketing company, and Byhalia Books, a book retailing business; she serves on the boards of the Stanley W. Lindberg Award and the Athens Historical Society; and she is the editor of numerous anthologies, including Literary New Orleans (Hill Street Press, 2000).

Becoming Writers Together

Philip Lee Williams (b. 1950) is the author of seventeen books, among them twelve novels, three works of nonfiction, and two volumes of poetry. His latest novel, Emerson’s Brother (Mercer University Press, 2012), is about the mentally challenged brother of Ralph Waldo Emerson; a thousand-page novel, The Divine Comics (2011), is a modern re-imagining and updating of Dante’s Divine Comedy; and The Flower Seeker: An Epic Poem of William Bartram (2010) was named Book of the Year by Books & Culture magazine. Williams’ books have been translated into Swedish, German, French, and Japanese and have appeared in large-print editions as well. A science writer and a teacher of creative writing at the University of Georgia for many years, Williams retired in 2012. He lives with his family in rural Oconee County, Georgia. (Inducted in 2010)

Laughs Last

Mary Hood, 2014 inductee to the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame, is the author of the novel Familiar Heat (1995) and the short-story collections And Venus Is Blue (1986) and How Far She Went (1984). A new collection of stories, A Clear View of the Southern Sky, is forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press in 2015.