Being Out Front at American Theater: An Interview with Gerald Weales

Stephen Corey joined the staff of The Georgia Review in 1983 as assistant editor and subsequently has served as associate editor, acting editor, and, since 2008, editor. His most recent book is Startled at the Big Sound: Essays Personal, Literary, and Cultural (Mercer University Press, 2017); he has also published nine collections of poems, among them There Is No Finished World (White Pine Press) and Synchronized Swimming (Livingston Press); his individual poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in dozens of periodicals; and he has coedited three books in as many genres, including (with Warren Slesinger) Spreading the Word: Editors on Poetry (The Bench Press). Over the past thirty-five years he has served as poet-in-residence or visiting poet/editor for numerous writing programs, conferences, and other literary gatherings, and he is currently a member of the core faculty for the low-residency MFA program at Reinhardt University. Born in Buffalo and reared in Jamestown, New York, Stephen Corey holds BA and MA degrees from Harpur College (now Binghamton University) and a PhD from the University of Florida.

A Holy Impropriety: The Stories of George Singleton

William Giraldi’s first novel, Busy Monsters, is forthcoming from W. W. Norton. He teaches in the writing program at Boston University, where he is also a senior editor for the journal AGNI.

Vaccination & Jayne Mansfield

George Singleton has published over three hundred stories in literary journals and magazines such as The Georgia Review, the Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s Magazine, One Story, the Southern Review, and Zoetrope. His eighth collection, Staff Picks, will be available in March 2019 from Yellow Shoe Fiction. A Guggenheim Fellow and a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, Singleton teaches in the English department at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Exit 19-A (Fall 1996)

Ronder Thomas Young (1954­–2006) published three award-winning young adult novels: Objects in Mirror (Roaring Book Press, 2002), one of the New York Public Library’s 2003 Best Books for the Teen Age; Moving Mama to Town (Orchard Books, 1997), recipient of the International Reading Association Award; and Learning by Heart (Houghton Mifflin, 1993; Puffin Books, 1995), an American Library Association Notable Book. Her short stories, essays, and articles appeared in The Georgia Review, Greensboro Review, Southeast Review, Writer’s Digest, Atlanta, Yemassee, storySouth, and Carve, among many others. At her death she was living in Norcross, Georgia; she is a native of South Carolina, where the Anderson County Library System is raising funds to establish a reading room in her memory.

The Columbus School for Girls (Fall 1991)

Liza Wieland’s third novel, A Watch of Nightingales (University of Michigan Press, 2009), won the Michigan Literary Fiction Award; her others are Bombshell (2001) and The Names of the Lost (1992), both from Southern Methodist University Press—which also published the second and third of her three story collections: You Can Sleep While I Drive (1999) and Quickening (2010). Wieland has won grants from the NEA, the Christopher Isherwood Foundation, and the North Carolina Arts Council, as well as two Pushcart prizes. She teaches at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina.

Which Rocks We Choose (Summer 2006)

George Singleton has published over three hundred stories in literary journals and magazines such as The Georgia Review, the Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s Magazine, One Story, the Southern Review, and Zoetrope. His eighth collection, Staff Picks, will be available in March 2019 from Yellow Shoe Fiction. A Guggenheim Fellow and a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, Singleton teaches in the English department at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Portrait of My Mother, Who Posed Nude in Wartime (Fall 1997)

Marjorie Sandor’s forthcoming memoir, The Late Interiors: A Life Under Construction (Arcade/Skyhorse Publishing), will be her fourth book. Her linked story collection, Portrait of My Mother, Who Posed Nude in Wartime (Sarabande, 2003), followed A Night of Music (Ecco, 1989) and won the National Jewish Book Award in Fiction; eight of her stories have appeared in GR. Sandor’s volume of essays The Night Gardener: A Search for Home (Lyons Press, 1999) won the 2000 Oregon Book Award for Literary Nonfiction, and her work has appeared in the Best American Short Stories and Pushcart Prize anthologies, among others. Sandor directs the MFA program in creative writing at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

Three Girls (Fall 2002)

Joyce Carol Oates is the author of some one hundred books in multiple genres, including the novel Little Bird of Heaven (2009), the story collection Sourland (2010), and the memoir A Widow’s Story (2011), all from Ecco. The 2010 recipient of the Ivan Sandrof Award for Lifetime Achievement of the National Book Critics Circle, Oates is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University, where she has taught since 1978. Oates’s “Ballerina” appeared in our fortieth-anniversary retrospective (Spring 1986).

Rembrandt’s Bones (Winter 1999)

Phyllis Moore is the author of the short-story collection A Compendium of Skirts (Carroll & Graf, 2002). Her work has been short-listed in the Best American Short Stories and Pushcart Prize anthologies, and she has been the recipient of numerous Florida and Illinois arts council grants. She received her PhD in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago and is a former co-chair of the MFA in writing program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is now the director of the School of Liberal Arts at the Kansas City Art Institute, where she teaches literature and writing and conducts the school’s Paris study abroad program.