The World Began with Charlie Chan (Spring 1989)

Frederick Busch (1941–2006) was a prolific short-story writer and an award-winning novelist. Professor of literature at Colgate University from 1966 to 2003, he authored twenty-seven books and more than one hundred short stories and essays. His many honors include an American Academy of Arts and Letters award for fiction in 1986 and the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction in 1991.

These Hands (Fall 1999)

Kevin Brockmeier is the author of nine books, including The Ghost Variations: One Hundred Stories (Pantheon, 2020), from which the three stories in this issue are taken. Some of his earlier contributions to The Georgia Review were reprinted in the Best American Short Stories and O. Henry Prize Stories anthologies. His work has been translated into eighteen languages. He teaches frequently at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and lives in Little Rock, Arkansas, where he was raised.

Angela Perfidia (Winter 1997)

Margaret Benbow’s poetry has appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, including Poetry, Kenyon Review, the Antioch Review, Prairie Schooner, and others. Her collection Stalking Joy (1997) won the Walt McDonald First Book award and was published by Texas Tech University Press. She recently completed a second collection, Wild Women in Old Movies, and she has also published short stories—including “Angela Perfidia” in both our Summer 1997 issue and our Spring 2011 fiction retrospective. In 2014 Benbow won the Zona Gale Award from the Council for Wisconsin Writers for the best published short story by a Wisconsin writer.

Time and Fear and Somehow Love (Spring 1985)

Lee K. Abbott is the author of seven collections of short fiction, most recently All Things, All at Once: New & Selected Stories (W. W. Norton, 2006). His work has appeared ten times previously in The Georgia Review and in nearly one hundred other periodicals, including the Atlantic, Harper’s, Epoch, Southern Review, and Boulevard. His work has also been featured in Best American Short Stories, O. Henry Awards: Prize Stories, Best of the West, and the Pushcart Prize. Twice a winner of National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, Abbott is Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor in English at Ohio State University, where he directs the MFA program in creative writing. “The Final Proof of Fate and Circumstance,” the first of Abbott’s eight stories to appear in GR (Fall 1983), was included in our fortieth-anniversary retrospective (Spring 1986).

Barding Around (on Robert Frost Speaking on Campus: Excerpts from His Talks, 1949–1962, edited by Edward Connery Lathem; Maxine Kumin’s The Roots of Things: Essays; Mark Doty’s The Art of Description: World into Word; Ellen Bryant Voigt’s The Art of Syntax: Rhythm of Thought, Rhythm of Song; Dean Young’s The Art of Recklessness: Poetry as Assertive Force and Contradiction; Kelly Cherry’s Girl in a Library: On Women Writers and the Writing Life; and Fanny Howe’s The Winter Sun: Notes on a Vocation)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

Walking the Line (on James Richardson’s By the Numbers; Robert Wrigley’s Beautiful Country; Elizabeth Bradfield’s Approaching Ice; and Robert Cording’s Walking with Ruskin)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Drinking Alone

Billy Collins’ latest collection of poetry is Horoscopes for the Dead (Random House, 2011). A former U.S. poet laureate, he is a Distinguished Professor at Lehman College (CUNY) and a Distinguished Fellow of the Winter Park Institute at Rollins College.

June, with Birds

Sydney Lea’s thirteenth collection of poems, Here, is forthcoming from Four Way Books next year. Also due in 2018, from Vermont’s Green Writers Press, are Lea’s collected newspaper columns from his years as Vermont poet laureate, News That Stay News: Lyric and Everyday Life, his, and a re-issue of his collaborative book of essays with former Delaware poet laureate Fleda Brown, Growing Old in Poetry: Two Poets, Two Lives.

Acetylene

Dave Smith is the Elliott Coleman Professor of Poetry in the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University. His newest book of poems, Hawks on Wires, is forthcoming from LSU Press this fall. Along with Robert DeMott, he edited the essay anthology Afield: Writers on Bird Dogs (Skyhorse Press, 2010).