Between Worlds, Refuge: Stephen Dunn and the Creative Writing Workshop

Laura McCullough’s latest poetry collection, her fourth, is PANIC, winner of a Kinereth Gensler Award (Alice James Books, 2011). She is the founder and editor of Mead: The Magazine of Literature and Libations and is editing a forthcoming anthology of essays on the poet Stephen Dunn. She has an MFA in fiction from Goddard College.

Brief Answers to Unspoken Questions: An Intraview

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

Relentlessly Interesting: An Interview with Stephen Dunn

Laura McCullough’s latest poetry collection, her fourth, is PANIC, winner of a Kinereth Gensler Award (Alice James Books, 2011). She is the founder and editor of Mead: The Magazine of Literature and Libations and is editing a forthcoming anthology of essays on the poet Stephen Dunn. She has an MFA in fiction from Goddard College.

A Great Celebration; The Puritan and the World; Landscape with Friends; Quieter; & Before We Leave

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

A Case for Charlie Chan (on Yunte Huan’s Charlie Chan: The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective and His Rendezvous with American History)

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.

Patterns in the Welter (on Maggie Smith’s The List of Dangers; Hugh Martin’s So, How Was the War?; Lynn Shoemaker’s A Catch in the Throat of Allah; Josie Sigler’s Calamity; Lynn Wagner’s No Blues This Raucous Song; Tracy S. Youngblom’s Driving to Heaven; Peter Filkins’ Augustine’s Vision; Hildred Crill’s The Upstairs Hammer; & Philip Metres’ The Abu Ghraib Arias)

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

Reimagining Appalachia (on Meredith Sue Willis’ Out of the Mountains: Appalachian Stories & Cathryn Hankla’s Fortune Teller Miracle Fish)

Lucy Bryan Green’s reviews of poetry, nonfiction, and fiction have appeared in or are forthcoming from New Letters, Rain Taxi Review of Books, Coldfront, and Green Mountains Review. She is the assistant to the director of the MFA creative writing program at Penn State University, from which she graduated in May 2011, and managing editor of Voices of Central Pennsylvania, an independent monthly news magazine.

November Nights

Coleman Barks, professor emeritus at the University of Georgia, has since 1977 collaborated with various scholars of the Persian language (most notably, John Moyne) to bring over into American free verse the poetry of the thirteenth-century mystic Jelaluddin Rumi. This work has resulted in twenty-one volumes, including the bestselling Essential Rumi in 1995. He has also published eight volumes of his own poetry, including Hummingbird Sleep: Poems 2009–2011 (2012) and Winter Sky: Poems 1968–2008 (2008), both from the University of Georgia Press. 

Sentences: An Assay; House Arrest: Revising; After; & Solitudes

Margaret Gibson is the current poet laureate of Connecticut and the author of twelve books of poems, all from Louisiana State University Press, most recently Not Hearing the Wood Thrush (2018) and The Glass Globe (forthcoming in 2021), as well as a memoir, The Prodigal Daughter (University of Missouri Press, 2008). The Vigil (1993) was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry; Broken Cup (2016) was a finalist for the Poets’ Prize, and its title poem won a Pushcart Prize that year. Gibson is professor emerita at the University of Connecticut.