Writing Studio

Andrea Hollander’s first published poem appeared in the Winter 1982 issue of The Georgia Review. Her first full-length poetry collection won the 1993 Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize; her fourth was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and creative nonfiction) and two fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. After living in the woods of the Arkansas Ozarks for thirty-five years, she moved to downtown Portland, Oregon, in 2011.

Smith’s Cloud & Linear

Albert Goldbarth is the author of more than twenty-five books of poetry, most recently Selfish (2015), Everyday People (2012), and The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems, 1972–2007 (2007), all from Graywolf Press. He has twice won the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.

That Story

Jack Driscoll’s latest collection, The Goat Fish and the Lover’s Knot (Wayne State University Press, 2017), received the 2018 Michigan Library Foundation Award for fiction. His forthcoming “New & Selected” will include eleven stories previously published in The Georgia Review and dating back to 1987. He currently teaches in Pacific University’s low-residency MFA program in Oregon.

American Theater Watch, 1977–2010 (excerpts and introduction by Stephen Corey)

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.

Being Out Front at American Theater: An Interview with Gerald Weales

Stephen Corey joined the staff of The Georgia Review in 1983 as assistant editor and subsequently served as associate editor, acting editor, and, from 2008 to his retirement in 2019, editor. His most recent book is Startled at the Big Sound: Essays Personal, Literary, and Cultural (Mercer University Press, 2017); he has also published nine collections of poems, among them There Is No Finished World (White Pine Press) and Synchronized Swimming (Livingston Press); his individual poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in dozens of periodicals; and he has coedited three books in as many genres, including (with Warren Slesinger) Spreading the Word: Editors on Poetry (The Bench Press). In the spring of 2022, White Pine Press will bring out his As My Age Then Was, So I Understood Them: New and Selected Poems.

A Holy Impropriety: The Stories of George Singleton

William Giraldi’s first novel, Busy Monsters, is forthcoming from W. W. Norton. He teaches in the writing program at Boston University, where he is also a senior editor for the journal AGNI.

Vaccination & Jayne Mansfield

George Singleton has published over three hundred stories in literary journals and magazines such as The Georgia Review, the Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s Magazine, One Story, the Southern Review, and Zoetrope. His eighth collection, Staff Picks, will be available in March 2019 from Yellow Shoe Fiction. A Guggenheim Fellow and a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, Singleton teaches in the English department at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Exit 19-A (Fall 1996)

Ronder Thomas Young (1954­–2006) published three award-winning young adult novels: Objects in Mirror (Roaring Book Press, 2002), one of the New York Public Library’s 2003 Best Books for the Teen Age; Moving Mama to Town (Orchard Books, 1997), recipient of the International Reading Association Award; and Learning by Heart (Houghton Mifflin, 1993; Puffin Books, 1995), an American Library Association Notable Book. Her short stories, essays, and articles appeared in The Georgia Review, Greensboro Review, Southeast Review, Writer’s Digest, Atlanta, Yemassee, storySouth, and Carve, among many others. At her death she was living in Norcross, Georgia; she is a native of South Carolina, where the Anderson County Library System is raising funds to establish a reading room in her memory.

The Columbus School for Girls (Fall 1991)

Liza Wieland’s third novel, A Watch of Nightingales (University of Michigan Press, 2009), won the Michigan Literary Fiction Award; her others are Bombshell (2001) and The Names of the Lost (1992), both from Southern Methodist University Press—which also published the second and third of her three story collections: You Can Sleep While I Drive (1999) and Quickening (2010). Wieland has won grants from the NEA, the Christopher Isherwood Foundation, and the North Carolina Arts Council, as well as two Pushcart prizes. She teaches at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina.