Close as I Can Get to Prayer

Carol Edelstein’s poetry and fiction have appeared in numerous anthologies and literary magazines, most recently Massachusetts Review and Peregrine. She has been leading writing workshops and overseeing a reading series in her hometown of Northampton, Massachusetts, for more than twenty years.

Got to Stop & Blessing-Bow

Coleman Barks, professor emeritus at the University of Georgia, has since 1977 collaborated with various scholars of the Persian language (most notably, John Moyne) to bring over into American free verse the poetry of the thirteenth-century mystic Jelaluddin Rumi. This work has resulted in twenty-one volumes, including the bestselling Essential Rumi in 1995. He has also published eight volumes of his own poetry, including Hummingbird Sleep: Poems 2009–2011 (2012) and Winter Sky: Poems 1968–2008 (2008), both from the University of Georgia Press. 

Notes from a Domestic Scene

 

I

Notebooks stood in a rack, straight and tightly shut beside a ruckus of birthday cards. Their colors drew my eye as I went past. I am overly susceptible to colors, even though so much of the world seems …

Marguerite W. Sullivan’s work has appeared in NOON, Sleepingfish, Clackamas Literary Review, and RHINO, as well as on Web Conjunctions. She lives in Vermont, where she is currently finishing a novel.

From The Gospel Singer

Harry Crews (1935–2012), born in Bacon County, was the author of nearly twenty novels, from The Gospel Singer (1968) to An American Family: The Baby with the Curious Markings (2006). His published nonfiction includes the first volume of his autobiography, A Childhood: The Biography of a Place (1978), and three essay collections. His papers are collected in the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Georgia; he was the subject of a special feature, including previously unpublished work and letters culled from that collection, in our Winter 2007 issue. Crews lived for decades in Gainesville, Florida, where he taught at the University of Florida. (Inducted in 2002)

Mouseskull

Ann Pancake’s first novel, Strange As This Weather Has Been (2007), was one of Kirkus Review’s Top Ten Fiction Books of 2007, won the 2007 Weatherford Prize, and was a finalist for the 2008 Orion Book Award and the 2008 Washington State Book Award. Her collection of short stories, Given Ground (2001), won the 2000 Bakeless Prize, and she has also received a Whiting Award, a NEA fellowship, and a Pushcart Prize. Her fiction and essays have appeared in such journals and anthologies as Orion, The Georgia Review, Poets & Writers, and New Stories from the South: The Year’s Best. She teaches in the Rainier Writing Workshop, the low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington.

And After a Sweet Singing Fall Down

Catherine Reid is the author of Coyote: Seeking the Hunter in Our Midst (Houghton Mifflin, 2004), and her essays have appeared in such journals as Massachusetts Review, Fourth Genre, Bellevue Literary Review, and Isotope: A Journal of Literary Nature and Science Writing. She directs the undergraduate creative writing program at Warren Wilson College, where she also teaches creative nonfiction and environmental writing.

In the Flesh

Martha Wiseman has been a theater student, a dancer and choreographer, an editor, and a bookseller. Her poetry has appeared in a variety of journals, and her long short story Double Vision (White Eagle Coffee Store Press, 2004) is available as a chapbook. She has published three previous essays in The Georgia Review. She teaches English and directs the writing center at Skidmore College.

Vigilance

Natasha Trethewey served two terms as Poet Laureate of the United States (2012–2014). She is the author of four collections of poetry: Thrall (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012), Native Guard (2006)—for which she was awarded the 2007 Pulitzer Prize—Bellocq’s Ophelia (2002), and Domestic Work (2000). Her book of nonfiction, Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, appeared in 2010 from the University of Georgia Press. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the NEA, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Beinecke Library at Yale, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Trethewey is Robert W. Woodruff Professor of English and Creative Writing at Emory University.

From The Temple Bombing

Melissa Fay Greene (b. 1952) is the author of five books of nonfiction, variously translated into a total of fifteen languages: Praying for Sheetrock (1991), The Temple Bombing (1996), Last Man Out (2003), There Is No Me Without You: One Woman’s Odyssey to Rescue Africa’s Children (2006), and No Biking in the House Without a Helmet (Sarah Crichton Books, 2011). Praying for Sheetrock was named one of the top one hundred works of American journalism of the twentieth century by the New York University School of Journalism. She has been the recipient of two National Book Award citations, a National Book Critics Circle citation, the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award, the Southern Book Critics Circle Award, the ACLU National Civil Liberties Award, and other honors, and she holds an honorary doctorate from Emory University. Greene’s work has appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, the Atlantic, Newsweek, Washington Post, LIFE, Elle, Redbook, the Wilson Quarterly, and other periodicals. She and her husband, defense attorney Don Samuel, live in Atlanta and are the parents of nine. (Inducted in 2011)