The Song of the Unnameable Thing; Oh; An Explanation of the Mechanics of Her Marvelous Invention; My Personal Mythology; & 1,000 (Exactly)

Albert Goldbarth is the author of more than twenty-five books of poetry, most recently Selfish (2015), Everyday People (2012), and The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems, 1972–2007 (2007), all from Graywolf Press. He has twice won the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.

Aunt Nellie’s Walk & The Brain

Alice Friman’s seventh collection of poetry is Blood Weather, forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press in 2019. She’s the winner of a Pushcart Prize and is included in Best American Poetry. New work is forthcoming in PloughsharesPlume, Shenandoah, Western Humanities Review, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was poet-in-residence at Georgia College and State University.

Two Uncertainties

Lola Haskins’s latest collection of poems, her fifteenth, is Asylum: Improvisations on John Clare (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019).

Portrait with Purple Shroud & Blue

Andrea Hollander’s first published poem appeared in the Winter 1982 issue of The Georgia Review. Her first full-length poetry collection won the 1993 Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize; her fourth was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and creative nonfiction) and two fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. After living in the woods of the Arkansas Ozarks for thirty-five years, she moved to downtown Portland, Oregon, in 2011.

In 1966 Debbie Fuller Was Sweet on Pluto & At the Convention of State Librarians, I Should Have Been Preaching to the Choir

David Clewell is the author of several collections of poems—most recently, Taken Somehow By Surprise (University of Wisconsin, 2011). He teaches writing and literature at Webster University in St. Louis and served as Missouri’s poet laureate from 2010–12. His claim to Charlie-the-Tuna-collecting fame is not at all overinflated.

Surrender

Ginger Eager’s fiction has appeared in Terrain and is forthcoming in the Blue Collar Review, and she is currently at work on a novel. Eager, who received her BSEd from the University of Georgia and her MFA from Bennington College, lives in Decatur, Georgia, with her husband and son.

Half Lives

Lynn Schmeidler’s “Being Stevie” is her third story to appear in The Georgia Review (see also Spring 2013 and Summer 2009). Her fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in the Southern Review, Mid-American Review, Opium, Southeast Review, Chelsea and other literary magazines. Her poetry chapbook Curiouser & Curiouser won the 2013 Grayson Books Chapbook Contest. She teaches at the Hudson Valley Writers Center in Sleepy Hollow, NY, and is at work on a story collection and a book of poetry.

“I Seem to Write You Everything”: Selected Letters to Stanley W. Lindberg, 1982–89 (Introduction by Douglas Carlson; Commentary by Stephen Corey)

Mary Hood, 2014 inductee to the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame, is the author of the novel Familiar Heat (1995) and the short-story collections And Venus Is Blue (1986) and How Far She Went (1984). A new collection of stories, A Clear View of the Southern Sky, is forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press in 2015.

The Woman Who Almost Bolted: An Interview with Mary Hood

William Walsh is the author of seven books. His new collection of poetry, Fly Fishing in Times Square, recently won the Editor’s Prize at Cervena Barva Press. It will be released in September. He is the director of the undergraduate and graduate writing programs at Reinhardt University in Waleska, Georgia. His work has appeared in Rattle, the Kenyon Review, the Valparaiso Poetry Review, Shenandoah, Literary Matters, Five Points, the AWP Chronicle, and elsewhere.