AMMO & EXPLOSIVES

Todd Boss’s poetry collections are Pitch (2012) and Yellowrocket (2008), both from W. W. Norton. His 35-part “Fragments for the 35W Bridge” was part of a collaboration with Swedish artist Maja Spasova called “Project 35W,” an August 2012 art installation on the Mississippi River. Panic, his verse retelling of Knut Hamsun’s 1894 novella Pan, will premiere as a one-man opera in late 2013, arranged by Boston Conservatory’s Andy Vores. Boss is a founding co-director of Motionpoems, a leading producer of poetry films—now in collaboration with Copper Canyon, Milkweed, Graywolf, and other publishers.

The Purification of the Temple

Bruce Bond is the author of fifteen books including For the Lost Cathedral (LSU Press, 2015) and The Other Sky (Etruscan Press, 2015). Four new books are forthcoming: Immanent Distance: Poetry and the Metaphysics of the Near at Hand (University of Michigan Press); Black Anthem (Tampa Review Prize, University of Tampa Press); Gold Bee, winner of the Crab Orchard Open Competition Award (Southern Illinois University Press); and Sacrum (Four Way Books). He holds a Regents Professorship at the University of North Texas.

Practicing Chinese Ink Drawing

Jack Ridl’s latest poetry collection is Practicing to Walk Like a Heron (Wayne State University Press, 2013). His collection Losing Season (CavanKerry Press) was named the 2009 “Sports Education Book of the Year” by the Institute for International Sport at the University of Rhode Island. Ridl taught for 37 years at Hope College in Michigan; in 1996, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching named him Michigan Professor of the Year.

He Drank Molotov Riptide Moonshine Rum

Charles Fort’s books include We Did Not Fear the Father: New and Selected Poems (Red Hen Press, 2012) and Mrs. Belladonna’s Supper Club Waltz: New and Selected Prose Poems (Backwaters Press, 2010). Born in working-class New Britain, Connecticut, he is the founder of the Wendy Fort Foundation Theater of Fine Arts. Fort is currently at work on Sorrow Road, a collection of one hundred villanelles, and a novel, The Last Black Hippie in Connecticut.

“Always Act Well the Part That Is Given You”

Sharon Dolin is the author of five books of poems, most recently (from the University of Pittsburgh Press) Whirlwind (2012) and Burn and Dodge (2008)—the latter a winner of the AWP Donald Hall Prize in Poetry. Awarded the 2013 Witter Bynner Fellowship from the Library of Congress, Dolin teaches at the Unterberg Poetry Center of the 92nd Street Y and directs the Center for Book Arts Annual Letterpress Poetry Chapbook Competition.

Music from Small Towns

Al Maginnes’ most recent poetry collection, Inventing Constellations, was published in October 2012 by Cherry Grove Collections and is reviewed in this issue (see page 366). New poems appear or are forthcoming in American Literary Review, Southern Humanities Review, Sugar House Review, Border Crossings, Crab Creek Review, and several others. Maginnes lives in Raleigh, NC, and teaches at Wake Technical Community College.

Blight

David Griffith has published short fiction in the Gettysburg Review, the New England Review, and STORY. He is a senior scientist and professor of anthropology at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina.

The Circus Train

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

on Phantom Camera by Jaswinder Bolina

Anya Groner’s essays, poems, and short stories have appeared in journals including the Oxford American, Ninth Letter, the Rumpus, Carolina Quarterly, and Juked. Groner received her MFA in fiction from the University of Mississippi, where she was a John and Renee Grisham fellow. Currently, she teaches writing at Loyola University in New Orleans and is at work on a novel.