Crow Music

Doug Ramspeck is the author of six poetry collections and one volume of short stories. His most recent book of poems, Naming the Field, is forthcoming from LSU Press. In 2013 his collection Original Bodies won the Michael Waters Poetry Prize, and in 2010 he received the Barrow Street Press Poetry Prize for Mechanical Fireflies. Ramspeck’s individual poems and stories have appeared in such journals as the Southern Review, the Kenyon Review, the Iowa Review, and Slate.

The Sex Life of Anacondas

Fleda Brown’s The Woods Are On Fire: New & Selected Poems will be out from the University of Nebraska Press in 2017. A former poet laureate of Delaware, she lives in Traverse City, Michigan, and is on the faculty of the Rainier Writing Workshop, a low-residency MFA program in Tacoma, Washington. 

The VOICE inside WATER

Coleman Barks, professor emeritus at the University of Georgia, has since 1977 collaborated with various scholars of the Persian language (most notably, John Moyne) to bring over into American free verse the poetry of the thirteenth-century mystic Jelaluddin Rumi. This work has resulted in twenty-one volumes, including the bestselling Essential Rumi in 1995. He has also published eight volumes of his own poetry, including Hummingbird Sleep: Poems 2009–2011 (2012) and Winter Sky: Poems 1968–2008 (2008), both from the University of Georgia Press. 

Let’s Ask the Fox

Laurie Kutchins’ three books of poetry include The Night Path (BOA Editions, 1997), which received the Isabella Gardner Award. Her poems and lyric essays have appeared previously in The Georgia Review, Southern Review, Orion, the New Yorker, and elsewhere. She directs the creative writing program at James Madison University.

Reliquary

Sarah Gordon is the author of A Literary Guide to Flannery O’Connor’s Georgia (2008) and Flannery O’Connor: The Obedient Imagination (2000), both from the University of Georgia Press. Her poetry has recently appeared in Sewanee Review, Shenandoah, Southeast Review, Southern Poetry Review, and Arts & Letters.

No Sermons in Stone

Richard Bernstein’s “Wheeling and Dealing” and “Wheelman” mark his fourth appearance in The Georgia Review. A twelve-time recipient of the Bright Hill Press New York State Poetry Teacher of the Year Award, he is currently in his twenty-eighth year as a high school English, creative writing, and drama teacher in Norwich, New York. He also teaches courses in English and public speaking at Morrisville State College.

After de Tocqueville

David Roderick’s poetry collection, The Americans, was published by University of Pittsburgh Press in 2014. Recently awarded a 2021–22 Creative Writing Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, he is the director of content at The Adroit Journal and co-directs Left Margin LIT, a creative writing center in Berkeley, California.

Griffonia

René Houtrides’ stories have appeared in The Georgia Review (Spring 2007), New Ohio Review, and Mississippi Review. Her play Calamity Jane was produced at New York City’s Wonderhorse Theater, nearly a dozen of her essays have aired on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, and her freelance work has appeared in the New York Times. Born and raised near Manhattan’s Little Italy and Chinatown, she has an MFA in writing from Bard College and is on the faculty of the Juilliard School’s drama division.

Luminaria

Christopher Ross lives in Middlebury, Vermont, where he recently completed a novel, “The Secret to Playing.” His fiction has appeared in the Southern Review and the Cortland Review.