Ode to Loss

J. Allyn Rosser’s fourth poetry collection, Mimi’s Trapeze, appeared in 2014 from Pittsburgh University Press. Rosser has received fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, the NEA, and the Ohio Arts Council. She teaches at Ohio University.

Girl Reading the Aeneid on the Subway

Ann Lauinger is the author of two books of poetry: Persuasions of Fall (University of Utah, 2004), which won the Agha Shahid Ali Prize, and Against Butterflies (Little Red Tree Publishing, 2013). Recent poems appear in Common Ground Review, Lumina, Spillway, and the anthology A Slant of Light: Contemporary Women Writers of the Hudson Valley; her translation of Vergil’s eighth Eclogue is forthcoming in the online journal Transference. Lauinger is a member of the literature faculty at Sarah Lawrence College.

Readers on the Hook: An Interview with Janette Turner Hospital

Charlotte Zoë Walker’s novel Condor and Hummingbird was published by Alice Walker’s Wild Trees Press in 1986 and by the Women’s Press in the United Kingdom in 1987. She has also published about a dozen short stories, as well as essays on literature and nature, and edited two books on naturalist John Burroughs (The Art of Seeing Things and Sharp Eyes, both from Syracuse University Press). Her previous publication in The Georgia Review was “The Very Pineapple,” which was reprinted in Prize Stories 1991: The O. Henry Awards. She has been a recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, and is nearing completion of her third novel, Gray Face and Eve. She is a professor emerita of English and women’s studies at SUNY-Oneonta.

Afterlife of a Stolen Child

Janette Turner Hospital, a native of Queensland, Australia, has lived and written in the United States for many years. (See Charlotte Zoë Walker’s essay and her interview with Hospital for more information.)

Border Crossings: The Fiction of Janette Turner Hospital

Charlotte Zoë Walker’s novel Condor and Hummingbird was published by Alice Walker’s Wild Trees Press in 1986 and by the Women’s Press in the United Kingdom in 1987. She has also published about a dozen short stories, as well as essays on literature and nature, and edited two books on naturalist John Burroughs (The Art of Seeing Things and Sharp Eyes, both from Syracuse University Press). Her previous publication in The Georgia Review was “The Very Pineapple,” which was reprinted in Prize Stories 1991: The O. Henry Awards. She has been a recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, and is nearing completion of her third novel, Gray Face and Eve. She is a professor emerita of English and women’s studies at SUNY-Oneonta.

Fool for Life: Three Essays

Alison Hawthorne Deming is the author of A Woven World: On Fashion, Fishermen, and the Sardine Dress (Counterpoint Press, 2021). Her other recent books include Zoologies: On Animals and the Human Spirit (Milkweed Editions, 2014) and the poetry collection Stairway to Heaven (Penguin, 2016). The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Wallace Stegner Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and the Walt Whitman Award, she is Regents Professor at the University of Arizona. She lives in Tucson and on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, Canada.

Ian Watt and the River Kwai

Jeffrey Meyers, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, has recently published Thomas Mann’s Artist-Heroes (Northwestern University Press, 2014), Remembering Iris Murdoch (Palgrave Pivot, 2013), and the paperback edition of Scott Fitzgerald: A Biography (Harper Perennial, 2014). Thirty of his books have been translated into fourteen languages and seven alphabets, and published on six continents. In 2012 he gave the Seymour lectures on biography, sponsored by the National Library of Australia, in Canberra, Melbourne, and Sydney.

Travels with Jane Eyre

Anne Goldman’s fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Tin House, the Guardian, The Georgia Review, the Gettysburg Review, and the Southwest Review, among other venues. Her essays have been named as notable in Best American Essays, Best American Science and Nature Writing, and the Best American Travel Writing. Nominated for a National Magazine Award, she is the recipient of fellowships from the Ahmanson/Getty Foundation and grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. Goldman is Professor of English at Sonoma State University. She is at work upon a second nonfiction manuscript, “An Aria for Insects and Other Essays.”

My Timbuktu

Adriana Páramo, a Colombian anthropologist, was the winner of the Social Justice and Equality Award in creative nonfiction for her book Looking for Esperanza (Benu Press, 2012). Her writing has appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, the Los Angeles Review, Fourteen Hills, Carolina Quarterly Review, and Compass Rose, among others. Páramo volunteers her time as a transcriber for Voice of Witness, a book series that empowers those affected by social injustice.