on Understanding Pat Conroy by Catherine Seltzer

Gary Kerley is a retired educator living in Bermuda Run, North Carolina. His reviews and articles have appeared in a number of publications and encyclopedias. An essay on the relationship between James Dickey and Pat Conroy and a review of Henry Taylor’s selected poems, This Tilted World Is Where I Live, will appear in the 2020 issue of The James Dickey Review. His articles on Alice Friman and William Walsh will appear next year on the online New Georgia Encyclopedia.

on I Greet You at the Beginning of a Great Career: The Selected Correspondence of Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Allen Ginsberg, 1955–1997, edited by Bill Morgan

Edward Butscher’s poetry and criticism have appeared in numerous literary journals and publications, including the Saturday Review of Literature, Newsday, and the American Book Review. In 1976 he published the first biography of Sylvia Plath, and in 1988 his biography Conrad Aiken: Poet of White Horse Vale won the Poetry Society of America’s Melville Cane Award.

on Pushcart Prize XL: Best of the Small Presses, edited by Bill Henderson

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

on They and We Will Get into Trouble for This by Anna Moschovakis

Is it possible to know whether the work we do makes any difference or whether the tasks and actions with which we fill our hours are meaningful? At my job I frequently employ diagrams called logic models—tools that can be …

Mary-Kim Arnold is the author of Litany for the Long Moment (Essay Press, 2018) and the forthcoming The Fish & The Dove (Noemi Press, 2020). Awarded fellowships from the Rhode Island Foundation and the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts, she holds an MFA from Brown University and now teaches there in the Nonfiction Writing Program.

on Who Can Afford to Improvise?: James Baldwin and Black Music, the Lyric and the Listeners by Ed Pavlić

Benjamin Hollander’s books include Letters for Olson (Spuyten Duyvil, 2016), In the House Un-American (Clockroot Books, 2013), Memoir American (Punctum Books, 2013), The Book of Who Are Was (1997), and (as editor) Translating Tradition: Paul Celan in France (1988).

on Living on Paper: Letters from Iris Murdoch, 1934–1995, edited by Avril Horner and Anne Rowe

Jeffrey Meyers, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, has recently published Thomas Mann’s Artist-Heroes (Northwestern University Press, 2014), Remembering Iris Murdoch (Palgrave Pivot, 2013), and the paperback edition of Scott Fitzgerald: A Biography (Harper Perennial, 2014). Thirty of his books have been translated into fourteen languages and seven alphabets, and published on six continents. In 2012 he gave the Seymour lectures on biography, sponsored by the National Library of Australia, in Canberra, Melbourne, and Sydney.

The Bias: Toward Fashion

Fashion changes, but style remains.
—Chanel

 

Of course, when we think of fashion we think of style. However, I am not sure, in spite of the recent efforts of museums and a handful of critics, how many of us—no matter …

Laurence Ross is a New Orleans–based writer, educator, and art critic. He recently served as the Director of P.3Writes, an educational program in conjunction with U.S. Art Triennial Prospect New Orleans. His essays on arts and culture are regularly featured in Pelican Bomb, a regional publication dedicated to the Louisiana arts community, and during the summer he teaches creative nonfiction for the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth.

Letter to Bob Hicok

Keith Ratzlaff teaches poetry and literature at Central College in Pella, Iowa. His most recent books of poetry, Then, A Thousand Crows (2009) and Dubious Angels: Poems after Paul Klee (2005), are from Anhinga Press, as will be his next, Who’s Asking? His poems and reviews have appeared recently in the Cincinnati Review, Arts and Letters, Colorado Review, and the American Reader; his honors include the Theodore Roethke Award, two Pushcart Prizes, and inclusion in The Best American Poetry 2009. 

A very small history book; Rebirth at the landfill; & Applied geometry

Bob Hicok’s ninth book, Hold, is just out from Copper Canyon Press.