Queen of the Waves

Gregory Wolos’ short fiction has recently appeared or is forthcoming in Post Road, the Pinch, the Baltimore Review, the Los Angeles Review, PANK, and many other journals and anthologies. His stories have earned five Pushcart Prize nominations and his story collections have been named as finalists for the 2010 and 2012 Flannery O’Connor Short Fiction Award and the 2015 Serena McDonald Kennedy Award. Wolos’ stories have won competitions sponsored by the Rubery Book Awards, Gulf Stream, and New South. He lives and writes in upstate New York on the bank of the Mohawk River.

My Heart Lies Between “The Fleet” and “All the Ships”

Ela Harrison’s poetry and book reviews have appeared in the New England Review, Cirque Journal, and F Magazine. She also contributes articles on environmental and nutritional issues to Be More Magazine and others. She holds advanced degrees in classical literature and linguistics and has traveled widely, studying herbs while living in places such as Alaska and Hawaii. Harrison received her MFA from the Rainier Writing Workshop in 2014 and is now based in Tucson, Arizona, where she translates, writes, edits, and makes herbal remedies.

Portrait of the Alcoholic with Shattered Pelvis

I am perfectly fine here: ice-choked, 

thin as an eyelash. The bootprints on 

my headboard are getting darker.

The chimney: clogged with fish eyes 

and sea glass. Somewhere my enemies 

are singing to the food on their plates.

As a

Kaveh Akbar is the founding editor of Divedapper. His poems have appeared recently in the New YorkerPoetryThe NationPloughshares, and elsewhere. His first book, Calling a Wolf a Wolf, is just out with Alice James in the U.S. and Penguin Books in the UK.

Coming Home to Earth: What Purse Seines, Pumpjacks, and a Twitter Feed from Space Taught One Worried Citizen about the Beauty of Climate Change in 2016

Summer camp. The Connecticut hills. Cumulous oaks and maples surround the glassy surface of the lake. At a distance the water looks black. Beneath my small hands, paddling forward, cupping down and pulling back, it sparkles, mica specks drifting in …

Alison Hawthorne Deming is the author of A Woven World: On Fashion, Fishermen, and the Sardine Dress (Counterpoint Press, 2021). Her other recent books include Zoologies: On Animals and the Human Spirit (Milkweed Editions, 2014) and the poetry collection Stairway to Heaven (Penguin, 2016). The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Wallace Stegner Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and the Walt Whitman Award, she is Regents Professor at the University of Arizona. She lives in Tucson and on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, Canada.

on Understanding Pat Conroy by Catherine Seltzer

Gary Kerley is a retired educator living in Bermuda Run, North Carolina. His reviews and articles have appeared in a number of publications and encyclopedias. An essay on the relationship between James Dickey and Pat Conroy and a review of Henry Taylor’s selected poems, This Tilted World Is Where I Live, will appear in the 2020 issue of The James Dickey Review. His articles on Alice Friman and William Walsh will appear next year on the online New Georgia Encyclopedia.

on I Greet You at the Beginning of a Great Career: The Selected Correspondence of Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Allen Ginsberg, 1955–1997, edited by Bill Morgan

Edward Butscher’s poetry and criticism have appeared in numerous literary journals and publications, including the Saturday Review of Literature, Newsday, and the American Book Review. In 1976 he published the first biography of Sylvia Plath, and in 1988 his biography Conrad Aiken: Poet of White Horse Vale won the Poetry Society of America’s Melville Cane Award.

on Pushcart Prize XL: Best of the Small Presses, edited by Bill Henderson

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

on They and We Will Get into Trouble for This by Anna Moschovakis

Is it possible to know whether the work we do makes any difference or whether the tasks and actions with which we fill our hours are meaningful? At my job I frequently employ diagrams called logic models—tools that can be …

Mary-Kim Arnold is the author of Litany for the Long Moment (Essay Press, 2018) and the forthcoming The Fish & The Dove (Noemi Press, 2020). Awarded fellowships from the Rhode Island Foundation and the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts, she holds an MFA from Brown University and now teaches there in the Nonfiction Writing Program.

on Who Can Afford to Improvise?: James Baldwin and Black Music, the Lyric and the Listeners by Ed Pavlić

Benjamin Hollander’s books include Letters for Olson (Spuyten Duyvil, 2016), In the House Un-American (Clockroot Books, 2013), Memoir American (Punctum Books, 2013), The Book of Who Are Was (1997), and (as editor) Translating Tradition: Paul Celan in France (1988).