Robinson Jeffers Redivivus

William H. Nolte (1928–1999), professor of English at the University of South Carolina from 1967 to 1990, was the author of Rock and Hawk: Robinson Jeffers and the Romantic Agony (1978) and H. L. Mencken, Literary Critic (1966). His essay, which originally appeared in the Summer 1978 Georgia Review, is reprinted here by permission of his daughter, Katherine Ann Nolte.

The World Has to Fall Away: An Interview with Rita Dove

I first met Rita Dove in person at Emory University in 1992 after she read from her just-published novel Through the Ivory Gate, but in truth I met her long before that when in 1985 I discovered the Morrow

William Walsh is the author of seven books. His new collection of poetry, Fly Fishing in Times Square, recently won the Editor’s Prize at Cervena Barva Press. It will be released in September. He is the director of the undergraduate and graduate writing programs at Reinhardt University in Waleska, Georgia. His work has appeared in Rattle, the Kenyon Review, the Valparaiso Poetry Review, Shenandoah, Literary Matters, Five Points, the AWP Chronicle, and elsewhere.

Dear Skull

beloved braincase, body’s bleeding heart

helmet law

 

dear ribs thick with implied meat, disused central

railroad, reverse spec house unplumbed

to propitious frame

 

dear double-strung forearm, dear violin bow,

 

dear pachyderm-eared pelvis,

 

dear barnacle spine—

 

Emily Van Kley’s poems have appeared in Nimrod, the Iowa Review, Crab Orchard Review, and Best New Poets 2013, among others. She is also a recipient of the Iowa Review Award and the Florida Review Editor’s Award. Her most recent project is an exchange of poems and images with the textile artist Sonja Dahl for 7×7.

Robinson Jeffers, the Big Read, and Me

Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor is a professor of TESOL and World Language Education at the University of Georgia. She is the winner of a 2015 Beckman Award for Professors Who Inspire, a 2013–14 Fulbright fellowship to Oaxaca, Mexico, several Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Prizes, and a Leeway Poetry Grant. Her book of poetry, Imperfect Tense (Whitepoint Press) will be published in July 2016, and she has co-authored two books, Teachers Act Up: Creating Multicultural Learning Communities Through Theatre (2010) and Arts-Based Research in Education (2007). Her poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Cream City Review, Barrow Street, and Puerto Del Sol, among others.

“Grief Can Be Stitched To Us”: An Interview with Brenda Peynado

Lindsay Tigue (LT): I really enjoyed “The Stones of Sorrow Lake,” and was impressed by the story’s central idea—how in Jackson’s hometown everyone’s first great sorrow becomes literally visible in the form of stones and then scars. This idea makes …

Lindsay Tigue won the Iowa Poetry Prize for her first book, System of Ghosts (University of Iowa Press, 2016). She writes poetry and prose and her work appears in Prairie Schooner, Indiana Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, and elsewhere. Tigue, a Sewanee Writers’ Conference scholar and Vermont Studio Center fellow, holds an MFA from Iowa State University and is currently a PhD student in creative writing at the University of Georgia.

An Interview with Earth Day’s Alison Hawthorne Deming

Lindsay Tigue (LT): Thank you so much for taking the time to answer some questions. I am such an admirer of your poems and essays. You’ve appeared in the pages of The Georgia Review several times. Can you talk a …

Lindsay Tigue won the Iowa Poetry Prize for her first book, System of Ghosts (University of Iowa Press, 2016). She writes poetry and prose and her work appears in Prairie Schooner, Indiana Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, and elsewhere. Tigue, a Sewanee Writers’ Conference scholar and Vermont Studio Center fellow, holds an MFA from Iowa State University and is currently a PhD student in creative writing at the University of Georgia.

Trauma and the Obligations of Poetry: A Conversation with Harold Schweizer

Laura Solomon (LS): Your poem “Shayma Interviewed by a Medical Red Cross Staff Member in Corigliano Calabro” begins with an epigraph from a story that appeared in the Independent:

“A ‘ghost ship’ carrying hundreds of Syrian refugees including pregnant

Laura Solomon, public outreach and digital projects manager at The Georgia Review, is currently co-executive director at the Woodland Pattern Book Center in Milwaukee. She holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of Massachusetts–Amherst and is the author of three books of poetry, most recently The Hermit (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2011).

The Soldiers Enter the House: An Interview with Brian Turner

Brian Turner earned an MFA from the University of Oregon and taught English in South Korea for a year before he joined the United States Army. He served in Bosnia-Herzegovina with the 10th Mountain Division and then, when he was …

Patrick Hicks is the author of eight books, most recently The Collector of Names: Stories (Schaffner Press, 2015), The Commandant of Lubizec: A Novel of the Holocaust and Operation Reinhard (Steerforth/Random House, 2014), and Adoptable (Salmon Poetry, 2014). He serves as the Writer-in-Residence at Augustana University and is on faculty at the MFA program at Sierra Nevada College.

on Counternarratives by John Keene

In 1995, thirty-year-old John Keene published his first book, the autobiographical novel Annotations. With its sentence fragments and snaking syntax, the book reads like a bildungsroman carved into pieces. The protagonist, an African American youth growing up in St. …

Alex McElroy’s writing appears or is forthcoming in New England Review, Copper Nickel, Kenyon Review Online, Black Warrior Review, and Catapult. He splits his time between New Hampshire and Texas.