I Get to Float Invisible

Someone’s sister in Europe writing her

adultery poems late night, half bottle 

of wine pretty much required. 

 

And they’re good, they really are— 

 

The things one hears in an elevator. 

Perfect strangers. I’ve always loved 

the perfect part,

Marianne Boruch’s ten poetry collections include the recent title The Anti-Grief (Copper Canyon Press, 2019). She was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Australia last year at the University of Canberra’s International Poetry Studies Institute, observing the astonishing wildlife to write a book-length sequence, a neo-ancient/medieval bestiary, which is forthcoming from Copper Canyon. The poems in this issue are a part of that collection.

The New Day

Enters in the heroic mode, feathered

And helmeted, muscle-bound

 

For glory, smelling of scorch. Raise

That sword a little higher

 

If you can lift it and buckle your straps

Tight. Insert fanfare. Nobody still

 

Gets to

Katharine Coles wrote her fifth poetry collection, The Earth Is Not Flat (Red Hen Press, 2013), under the auspices of the National Science Foundation’s Antarctic Artists and Writers Program. Ten poems from the book, translated into German by Klaus Martens, appeared in the Summer 2014 issue of Matrix, and her work is currently being translated into Spanish and Italian. Her sixth book, Flight, is due out from Red Hen in 2016. A professor at the University of Utah, Coles has served as Utah poet laureate (2006–2012) and as the inaugural director of the Poetry Foundation’s Harriet Monroe Poetry Institute (2009–2010).

Sk8r

June, 1985

If it had been night, the neighbors wouldn’t have stared at Ilsa in the back of the squad car. In darkness, the blue and red lights overhead might strobe her mother and Harold into sight, but Ilsa would …

Siân Griffiths directs the creative writing program at Weber State University. Her work has appeared in Fifth Wednesday Journal, Ninth Letter, the Rumpus, Quarterly West, and many other publications. Her first novel, Borrowed Horses (New Rivers Press, 2013), was a semi-finalist for the 2014 VCU Cabell First Novelist Award.

Mad Pieces

1.

In 1392, King Charles VI of France suffered the first of forty-four recorded psychotic episodes, turning on his soldiers and killing four before he was subdued. During subsequent bouts of insanity, he forgot he was king or thought he …

Mairead Small Staid is the 2017–18 George Bennett Fellow at Phillips Exeter Academy, where she is at work on her first book. Her poems and essays have appeared in AGNI, the Believer, Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, and elsewhere.

Smoking with the Dead and Wounded

For many years, I practiced the art of dying. During my enlistment as an active duty infantryman in the U.S. Army, I died more times than I can remember. I was blown up by a simulated hand grenade inside a …

Brian Turner is a writer and musician living in Orlando, Florida. He curates The Kiss series at Guernica, soon to be published as an anthology by W.W. Norton & Company (2018). He has published a memoir, My Life as a Foreign Country (W. W. Norton, 2015), two collections of poetry—Here, Bullet (2005) and Phantom Noise (2010), and co-edited The Strangest of Theatres (McSweeney’s/The Poetry Founda-tion, 2013). He is currently at work on a second memoir, “The Wild Delight of Wild Things,” and an album of music, “11 11 (Me, Smiling),” with his group, The Inter-planetary Acoustic Team. His late wife, the poet Ilyse Kusnetz, will have her second collection of poems, Angel Bones, published by Alice James Books in May 2019.

Finite Paragraphs & “Golden Gloves”: Talking with David Huddle

Doug Carlson: When I read the typescript version of “Golden Gloves” for the first time, I confess I was most of the way through before I noticed something odd about its shape. And only after I looked back did I …

Doug Carlson joined the Review staff in January 2007 and works primarily in manuscript evaluation and nonfiction editing. Carlson’s essays on natural and cultural history have appeared frequently in magazines and journals as well as in several anthologies, including A Place Apart (W. W. Norton) and The Sacred Place (University of Utah Press). His work has been collected in two books: At the Edge (White Pine Press) and When We Say We’re Home (University of Utah Press). His most recent book, Roger Tory Peterson: A Biography, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2007. Before coming to the Review, Carlson was visiting writer-in-residence at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. He is a former chair of the UGA Press Faculty Editorial Board and has served in editorial or advisory capacities for Ascent magazine, White Pine Press, and New Rivers Press.

“The Internet Is a Poetry Comic”: A Conversation with Bianca Stone

Laura Solomon: I find your mark-making deeply expressive and uniquely unpredictable—at times even messy—and yet simultaneously highly economic—sometimes, with regard to your approach to figures, a bit like Egon Schiele’s. In my introduction to We Dust the Walls, I …

Laura Solomon, public outreach and digital projects manager at The Georgia Review, is currently co-executive director at the Woodland Pattern Book Center in Milwaukee. She holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of Massachusetts–Amherst and is the author of three books of poetry, most recently The Hermit (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2011).

“Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning”

It looks like dancing the merengue, 

 

like reading Anna Karenina on a tablet in the dark car, 

the window’s greening glow against the night. 

 

Or: like the horse in the stall waiting for the gun 

and the gate

Rachel Richardson is the author of two books of poems, Copperhead (2011) and Hundred-Year Wave (forthcoming 2016), both from Carnegie Mellon University Press. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and the Wallace Stegner Program at Stanford University. Her poetry and prose appear in Guernica, New England Review, Kenyon Review Online, the Rumpus, and elsewhere. A contributing editor at Memorious, she lives in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Wabi Sabi

侘寂 

 

To love a thing

whose demise

you can foresee:

a swallow flying

through a windstorm, 

a teapot cracked.

 

A lopsided house,

stone roof off

center, leftmost stilts

sinking. Inside,

a couple

stacking bowls

in downward-sloping

cupboards, sleeping

Brianna Noll recently received her PhD from the Program for Writers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and serves as poetry editor of The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought, which she helped found. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in Kenyon Review Online, Hotel Amerika, Puerto del Sol, and the American Book Review.