Float

Walk into my room and come to find one of my Jordan Air Max 360s floating about five foot off the ground. Soon as I see it, my heart kinda go pie-yow! and my neck get hot. Then I smile …

Reginald McKnight is the author of He Sleeps (Picador, 2002), The Kind of Light That Shines on Texas (1996), and I Get on the Bus (1990), among others. He is a professor of creative writing and literature at the University of Georgia.

A Quickening of Forgotten Fields

Pattiann Rogers has published fourteen books of poetry, most recently Holy Heathen Rhapsody (Penguin, 2013), and a selection of her uncollected poems is forthcoming from Penguin/Random House in 2018. A gathering of 329 journals and magazines containing her poems was recently acquired by Texas Tech University and is housed in the Sowell Family Collection in Literature, Community, and the Natural World.

Still Hunt

The American Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art has an airy, skylit atrium, the recently remodeled Engelhard Sculpture Court, a place overflowing with marble and curious marvels. In one corner, the Vanderbilts’ humongous hearth. Over there, glowing Tiffany windows. …

Nick Neely’s nonfiction and poetry have been published or are forthcoming in the Kenyon Review, the Threepenny Review, the Southern Review, the Missouri Review, and elsewhere. His chapbook of lyrical essays, Chiton, and Other Creatures, was published in 2015 by New Michigan Press, and his first full-length essay collection, Coast Range, is forthcoming from Counterpoint Press. He is the recipient of a PEN/ Northwest Margery Davis Boyden Wilderness Writing Residency, a UC Berkeley– 11th Hour Food and Farming Journalism Fellowship, and the 2015 John Burroughs Nature Essay Award.

Blind Spot

Andrew Menard is the author of Learning from Thoreau (University of Georgia Press, 2018) and Sight Unseen: How Frémont’s First Expedition Changed the American Landscape (Bison Books, 2012). His most recent essays and articles have appeared in Antioch ReviewThe Georgia ReviewHinterlandJournal of American StudiesOxford Art Journal, and the New England Quarterly. 

Robinson Jeffers Redivivus

William H. Nolte (1928–1999), professor of English at the University of South Carolina from 1967 to 1990, was the author of Rock and Hawk: Robinson Jeffers and the Romantic Agony (1978) and H. L. Mencken, Literary Critic (1966). His essay, which originally appeared in the Summer 1978 Georgia Review, is reprinted here by permission of his daughter, Katherine Ann Nolte.

The World Has to Fall Away: An Interview with Rita Dove

I first met Rita Dove in person at Emory University in 1992 after she read from her just-published novel Through the Ivory Gate, but in truth I met her long before that when in 1985 I discovered the Morrow

William Walsh is the author of seven books. His new collection of poetry, Fly Fishing in Times Square, recently won the Editor’s Prize at Cervena Barva Press. It will be released in September. He is the director of the undergraduate and graduate writing programs at Reinhardt University in Waleska, Georgia. His work has appeared in Rattle, the Kenyon Review, the Valparaiso Poetry Review, Shenandoah, Literary Matters, Five Points, the AWP Chronicle, and elsewhere.

Dear Skull

beloved braincase, body’s bleeding heart

helmet law

 

dear ribs thick with implied meat, disused central

railroad, reverse spec house unplumbed

to propitious frame

 

dear double-strung forearm, dear violin bow,

 

dear pachyderm-eared pelvis,

 

dear barnacle spine—

 

Emily Van Kley’s poems have appeared in Nimrod, the Iowa Review, Crab Orchard Review, and Best New Poets 2013, among others. She is also a recipient of the Iowa Review Award and the Florida Review Editor’s Award. Her most recent project is an exchange of poems and images with the textile artist Sonja Dahl for 7×7.

Robinson Jeffers, the Big Read, and Me

Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor is a professor of TESOL and World Language Education at the University of Georgia. She is the winner of a 2015 Beckman Award for Professors Who Inspire, a 2013–14 Fulbright fellowship to Oaxaca, Mexico, several Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Prizes, and a Leeway Poetry Grant. Her book of poetry, Imperfect Tense (Whitepoint Press) will be published in July 2016, and she has co-authored two books, Teachers Act Up: Creating Multicultural Learning Communities Through Theatre (2010) and Arts-Based Research in Education (2007). Her poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Cream City Review, Barrow Street, and Puerto Del Sol, among others.

“Grief Can Be Stitched To Us”: An Interview with Brenda Peynado

Lindsay Tigue (LT): I really enjoyed “The Stones of Sorrow Lake,” and was impressed by the story’s central idea—how in Jackson’s hometown everyone’s first great sorrow becomes literally visible in the form of stones and then scars. This idea makes …

Lindsay Tigue won the Iowa Poetry Prize for her first book, System of Ghosts (University of Iowa Press, 2016). She writes poetry and prose and her work appears in Prairie Schooner, Indiana Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, and elsewhere. Tigue, a Sewanee Writers’ Conference scholar and Vermont Studio Center fellow, holds an MFA from Iowa State University and is currently a PhD student in creative writing at the University of Georgia.