Finite Paragraphs & “Golden Gloves”: Talking with David Huddle

Doug Carlson: When I read the typescript version of “Golden Gloves” for the first time, I confess I was most of the way through before I noticed something odd about its shape. And only after I looked back did I …

Doug Carlson joined the Review staff in January 2007 and works primarily in manuscript evaluation and nonfiction editing. Carlson’s essays on natural and cultural history have appeared frequently in magazines and journals as well as in several anthologies, including A Place Apart (W. W. Norton) and The Sacred Place (University of Utah Press). His work has been collected in two books: At the Edge (White Pine Press) and When We Say We’re Home (University of Utah Press). His most recent book, Roger Tory Peterson: A Biography, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2007. Before coming to the Review, Carlson was visiting writer-in-residence at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. He is a former chair of the UGA Press Faculty Editorial Board and has served in editorial or advisory capacities for Ascent magazine, White Pine Press, and New Rivers Press.

“The Internet Is a Poetry Comic”: A Conversation with Bianca Stone

Laura Solomon: I find your mark-making deeply expressive and uniquely unpredictable—at times even messy—and yet simultaneously highly economic—sometimes, with regard to your approach to figures, a bit like Egon Schiele’s. In my introduction to We Dust the Walls, I …

Laura Solomon, public outreach and digital projects manager at The Georgia Review, is currently co-executive director at the Woodland Pattern Book Center in Milwaukee. She holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of Massachusetts–Amherst and is the author of three books of poetry, most recently The Hermit (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2011).

“Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning”

It looks like dancing the merengue, 

 

like reading Anna Karenina on a tablet in the dark car, 

the window’s greening glow against the night. 

 

Or: like the horse in the stall waiting for the gun 

and the gate

Rachel Richardson is the author of two books of poems, Copperhead (2011) and Hundred-Year Wave (forthcoming 2016), both from Carnegie Mellon University Press. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and the Wallace Stegner Program at Stanford University. Her poetry and prose appear in Guernica, New England Review, Kenyon Review Online, the Rumpus, and elsewhere. A contributing editor at Memorious, she lives in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Wabi Sabi

侘寂 

 

To love a thing

whose demise

you can foresee:

a swallow flying

through a windstorm, 

a teapot cracked.

 

A lopsided house,

stone roof off

center, leftmost stilts

sinking. Inside,

a couple

stacking bowls

in downward-sloping

cupboards, sleeping

Brianna Noll recently received her PhD from the Program for Writers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and serves as poetry editor of The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought, which she helped found. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in Kenyon Review Online, Hotel Amerika, Puerto del Sol, and the American Book Review.

Cloud Study

Clouds, come down to sleep in the treetops— 

if you’ve seen the pines’ wide boughs 

 

cradle the snow, even from a distance, 

you know they can hold you. Or float 

 

yourself into a roofless, falling-down barn 

and lie

Maggie Smith’s second book of poems, The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison (Tupelo Press, 2015), was selected by Kimiko Hahn as the winner of the Dorset Prize. Smith is also the author of Lamp of the Body (Red Hen Press, 2005)—winner of the Benjamin Saltman Award—and three prize-winning chapbooks, the latest of which is Disasterology (Dream Horse Press, 2013). A 2011 National Endowment for the Arts Fellow, Smith has also received fellowships from the Ohio Arts Council and the Sustainable Arts Foundation.

The Pool

The MacEvoys had the pool dug out of their backyard in April of 1983. For three straight Saturdays in March, Bob Cobb and Dan Gray and Lee MacEvoy, in dungarees and sweatshirts, put their backs into saws and shovels and …

Kyle C. Mellen’s honors include the Alaska Literary Award (2015) and the Sherwood Anderson Fiction Award (2012). Originally from Massachusetts, he lives in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Stamp Fever

Father’s latest gift to his 14-year-old son was in a box on which was printed THE GOLDEN GALLEON OF STAMPS, a cornucopia that guaranteed more than a thousand stamps from around the world. And accompanying it, an album, every …

Colette Inez, author of eleven books of poetry, has received numerous honors for her work—including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, two awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, two Pushcart Prizes, and three others from the Poetry Society of America, which recently announced a new prize in her name.

Gary Ferguson & Alexis de Tocqueville Sit Down with Some of Earth’s Enemies

Let’s face it: the nexus of American nature writing resides in the mountains. To have hiked at a mile high—at least, but preferably twice that—and written about it is almost a required endeavor. Gary Ferguson has done this and more. …

Doug Carlson joined the Review staff in January 2007 and works primarily in manuscript evaluation and nonfiction editing. Carlson’s essays on natural and cultural history have appeared frequently in magazines and journals as well as in several anthologies, including A Place Apart (W. W. Norton) and The Sacred Place (University of Utah Press). His work has been collected in two books: At the Edge (White Pine Press) and When We Say We’re Home (University of Utah Press). His most recent book, Roger Tory Peterson: A Biography, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2007. Before coming to the Review, Carlson was visiting writer-in-residence at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. He is a former chair of the UGA Press Faculty Editorial Board and has served in editorial or advisory capacities for Ascent magazine, White Pine Press, and New Rivers Press.

Divided in So Many Ways: A Discussion with Karen Hays

Thibault Raoult: “Auto-Duet” is heartbreaking, illuminating work, which, while possessing airtight transitions, nonetheless leaves me, as reader, bouncing around in the ideational echo chamber you so seamlessly build. Rather than continue to bounce around (poignant as that may be), I’ll …

Thibault Raoult was an assistant editor at The Georgia Review from 2015 to 2017. He now teaches at University of Maryland. Raoult holds a PhD from University of Georgia and an MFA in Literary Arts from Brown University; he has published two books of poems—Person Hour (2011) and Disposable Epics (2014)—and the cross-genre text «Pro(m)bois(e)» (2016).