Chew on This

When we asked Christopher Merrill—a portion of whose prose collaboration with Marvin Bell appears in our Winter 2013 issue—to tell us what he had been reading as of late, he gladly agreed, and then surprised us over the holidays

Christopher Merrill has six poetry collections; many works of translation and edited volumes, among them The Forgotten Language: Contemporary Poets and Nature (1991) and From the Faraway Nearby: Georgia O’Keeffe as Icon (1993, reissued 1998); and six books of nonfiction, most recently Self-Portrait with Dogwood (Trinity University Press, 2017). His work has been translated into nearly forty languages and his honors include a knighthood in arts and letters from the French government. As director of the University of Iowa’s International Writing Program, he has undertaken cultural diplomacy missions to more than fifty countries.

Imagining My Way into the Truth: An Interview with Kevin Brockmeier

John Brown Spiers: Dead Last is a Kind of Second Place,” your piece in the Winter 2013 issue of The Georgia Review, is excerpted from your forthcoming memoir A Few Seconds of Radiant Filmstrip. After having read …

Notes for an Epilogue: Documenting Rural Romania

Tamas Dezso (b. 1978, Budapest) is a fine-art documentary photographer whose recent work focuses on long-term engagement with margins of society in Hungary, Romania, and other parts of Eastern Europe. Dezso started off as a domestic photojournalist, then a decade …

Tamas Dezso’s award-winning photographs have appeared in publications such as TIME, the New York Times, National Geographic, PDN, Le Monde Magazine, the Sunday Times, the British Journal of Photography, and others. He is represented by the Robert Koch Gallery in San Francisco, and he has had solo exhibitions in Brussels, Budapest, Bratislava, New York, Santa Fe, and elsewhere.

Goodness in Mississippi

—After Gwendolyn Brooks’s “We Real Cool,”
    with thanks to Terrance Hayes

 

My friend said I wasn’t fat but she was, and we

would go on that way, back and forth. She was my first real 

 

friend, the kind

LaWanda Walters is the author of a forthcoming book of poems, Light Is the Odalisque, selected by Pamela Uschuk and William Pitt Root for the Silver Concho Series at Press 53. Her “Goodness in Mississippi,” originally published in The Georgia Review (Winter 2013) was chosen by Sherman Alexie for Best American Poetry 2015.

Dead Last Is a Kind of Second Place

Jell-O Pudding Pops that preserve the wavelike peaked shape of your lips. Little Debbie Fudge Brownies that break in half along a groove in the frosting. Summer sausages like No. 2 pencils, cling-wrapped together on a Styrofoam platter. Strawberry Fruit …

Kevin Brockmeier is the author of nine books, including The Ghost Variations: One Hundred Stories (Pantheon, 2020), from which the three stories in this issue are taken. Some of his earlier contributions to The Georgia Review were reprinted in the Best American Short Stories and O. Henry Prize Stories anthologies. His work has been translated into eighteen languages. He teaches frequently at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and lives in Little Rock, Arkansas, where he was raised.

Fiction That Performs As Only Fiction Can: An Interview with Ann Pancake

John Brown Spiers: To what extent do you think a novel needs to be dependent upon plot? You’ve spoken of what you perceived to be your own deficiencies with plot while writing Strange As This Weather Has Been, but …

The Forest Was Loaded with Untold Stories: An Interview with Julie Riddle

John Brown Spiers: An early paragraph in “Shadow Animals” describes your reaction to your father laying sand on a wild-game trail on your new property in northwest Montana. He does this to capture hoofprints and determine what sort of wildlife …

Material Memories

Combining elements of family photos, still lifes, and grand manner portraiture—think of idealized and elite historical subjects depicted life-size and full length—New Jersey native Celeste Rapone’s paintings explore how human behavior, over time, frequently becomes performance as a result of …

Celeste Rapone received a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her work has been exhibited in galleries in New York City, Chicago, Providence, and elsewhere, and is one of the winners of New American Paintings’ 2012 MFA Annual Competition, juried this time by Dominic Molon, chief curator at the Contemporary Art Museum in St. Louis.

Maxine Kumin: Making Contact

The Concord Monitor recently ran a two-part interview with Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Maxine Kumin—here are parts one and two—and we were reminded of the wonderful package of photos Maxine sent us to go through when we were preparing to …