White Peaches

The white peaches announce themselves on the kitchen counter, 

quick scent flinting alight the worm-eaten dawn, 

the clean-edged note almost mineral, so unlike 

the vague, pulpy yellow of girlhood:

 

the backyard peach tree bowed down with too much 

sun-bruised

Kyoko Uchida’s poetry, prose, and translations have appeared in The Georgia Review, Manoa, North American Review, Prairie Schooner, and other journals on three continents; her poetry collection Elsewhere was published by Texas Tech University Press in 2012. Uchida works for a nonprofit organization in New York City.

The Dead

Miles Wilson is the founding director of the MFA program at Texas State University. He is the author of three prize-winning books: Fire Season (Stephen F. Austin State University Press, 2014), Harm (2003), and Line of Fall (1989). His previous story in The Georgia Review (“Everything,” Winter 1987) was one of three cited when The Georgia Review was named a finalist for the National Magazine Award in Fiction in 1988.

Jules Verne Seeks Dreamers for Long-Distance Travel in Time

My father was on his long taxi journey when my mother said she might have a crush on someone. “Someone who doesn’t do quixotic things for quick money,” she flounced. In the year before the little shuttle I had been …

Mary O’Donoghue, who grew up in County Clare, Ireland, is the author of the novel Before the House Burns (Lilliput Press, 2010). She began writing “Jules Verne . . . ” during a residency at the Vermont Studio Center. She teaches in the Arts and Humanities division at Babson College and is completing a short-story collection.

Secret Information

The other day, for no particular reason I can think of, I mentioned to my middle-aged daughter in conversation that I had been cleared for “secret” when I was in the army. Surprised, she commented, “I never knew you had …

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

Chew on This

When we asked Christopher Merrill—a portion of whose prose collaboration with Marvin Bell appears in our Winter 2013 issue—to tell us what he had been reading as of late, he gladly agreed, and then surprised us over the holidays

Christopher Merrill has six poetry collections; many works of translation and edited volumes, among them The Forgotten Language: Contemporary Poets and Nature (1991) and From the Faraway Nearby: Georgia O’Keeffe as Icon (1993, reissued 1998); and six books of nonfiction, most recently Self-Portrait with Dogwood (Trinity University Press, 2017). His work has been translated into nearly forty languages and his honors include a knighthood in arts and letters from the French government. As director of the University of Iowa’s International Writing Program, he has undertaken cultural diplomacy missions to more than fifty countries.

Imagining My Way into the Truth: An Interview with Kevin Brockmeier

John Brown Spiers: Dead Last is a Kind of Second Place,” your piece in the Winter 2013 issue of The Georgia Review, is excerpted from your forthcoming memoir A Few Seconds of Radiant Filmstrip. After having read …

Notes for an Epilogue: Documenting Rural Romania

Tamas Dezso (b. 1978, Budapest) is a fine-art documentary photographer whose recent work focuses on long-term engagement with margins of society in Hungary, Romania, and other parts of Eastern Europe. Dezso started off as a domestic photojournalist, then a decade …

Tamas Dezso’s award-winning photographs have appeared in publications such as TIME, the New York Times, National Geographic, PDN, Le Monde Magazine, the Sunday Times, the British Journal of Photography, and others. He is represented by the Robert Koch Gallery in San Francisco, and he has had solo exhibitions in Brussels, Budapest, Bratislava, New York, Santa Fe, and elsewhere.

Goodness in Mississippi

—After Gwendolyn Brooks’s “We Real Cool,”
    with thanks to Terrance Hayes

 

My friend said I wasn’t fat but she was, and we

would go on that way, back and forth. She was my first real 

 

friend, the kind

LaWanda Walters is the author of a forthcoming book of poems, Light Is the Odalisque, selected by Pamela Uschuk and William Pitt Root for the Silver Concho Series at Press 53. Her “Goodness in Mississippi,” originally published in The Georgia Review (Winter 2013) was chosen by Sherman Alexie for Best American Poetry 2015.

Dead Last Is a Kind of Second Place

Jell-O Pudding Pops that preserve the wavelike peaked shape of your lips. Little Debbie Fudge Brownies that break in half along a groove in the frosting. Summer sausages like No. 2 pencils, cling-wrapped together on a Styrofoam platter. Strawberry Fruit …

Kevin Brockmeier is the author of nine books, including The Ghost Variations: One Hundred Stories (Pantheon, 2020), from which the three stories in this issue are taken. Some of his earlier contributions to The Georgia Review were reprinted in the Best American Short Stories and O. Henry Prize Stories anthologies. His work has been translated into eighteen languages. He teaches frequently at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and lives in Little Rock, Arkansas, where he was raised.