In and Out of Order

Brian Henry’s most recent book of poetry, Permanent State, was published by Threadsuns in 2020. He has translated Tomaž Šalamun’s Woods and Chalices (Harcourt, 2008), Aleš Debeljak’s Smugglers (BOA Editions, 2015), and Aleš Šteger’s Above the Sky Beneath the Earth (White Pine Press, 2019) and The Book of Things (BOA Editions, 2010), which won the Best Translated Book Award in Poetry. His numerous honors include the Alice Fay di Castagnola Award, a Slovenian Academy of Arts and Sciences grant, and fellowships from the Howard Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Silk

Alison Hawthorne Deming is the author of A Woven World: On Fashion, Fishermen, and the Sardine Dress (Counterpoint Press, 2021). Her other recent books include Zoologies: On Animals and the Human Spirit (Milkweed Editions, 2014) and the poetry collection Stairway to Heaven (Penguin, 2016). The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Wallace Stegner Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and the Walt Whitman Award, she is Regents Professor at the University of Arizona. She lives in Tucson and on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, Canada.

Asleep in Japan in the 13th Century & Asleep in Sweden in the 18th Century

 

Asleep in Japan in the 13th Century

 

Yume no yo no utsutsunariseba ikani semu sameyuku hodo o mateba koso are If this world is only a reflection of a dream what can I do but wait until I

Eliot Weinberger’s most recent book, Angels & Saints, was published by New Directions in 2020.

To Our readers

April–May 2021

Georgia is in the news these days. As the national news media collectively strives to right the wrong of coastal myopia that was laid bare by the 2016 election, we have seen within the past couple of years …

Gerald Maa is a writer, translator, and editor based in Athens, GA.  His poetry and translations have appeared in places such as Poetry, American Poetry Review, and Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China (Copper Canyon, 2011).  His essays have appeared in places such as Criticism, Studies in Romanticism, A Sense of Regard: Essays on Poetry and Race (University of Georgia, 2015), and The Little Magazine in Contemporary America (University of Chicago, 2015).  Work from his practice of activated writing have been performed and mounted in Los Angeles, New York, and Sweden.  In 2010, he founded The Asian American Literary Review with Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, where he served as editor-in-chief until starting his job at The Georgia Review in August 2019.

 

The Georgia Review’s Emerging Writer Fellowship Program

The Georgia Review is pleased to announce our Emerging Writer Fellowship Program! Entries will be accepted June 1st—August 15th (additional instructions below).
   
With support from the National Endowment for the Arts, The Georgia Review will publish a special issue …

To Our Readers

January 2021

And thus begins our seventh-fifth number.

Seventy-five is certainly a milestone, but I have learned much from Grandma Huang about age. It was a blessing to live within driving distance of my maternal grandmother during the first few …

Gerald Maa is a writer, translator, and editor based in Athens, GA.  His poetry and translations have appeared in places such as Poetry, American Poetry Review, and Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China (Copper Canyon, 2011).  His essays have appeared in places such as Criticism, Studies in Romanticism, A Sense of Regard: Essays on Poetry and Race (University of Georgia, 2015), and The Little Magazine in Contemporary America (University of Chicago, 2015).  Work from his practice of activated writing have been performed and mounted in Los Angeles, New York, and Sweden.  In 2010, he founded The Asian American Literary Review with Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, where he served as editor-in-chief until starting his job at The Georgia Review in August 2019.

 

To Our Readers

7 October 2020

During last year’s annual conference for the Association of Writers and Writing Programs, more commonly known as AWP (where did the other “W” go?), I participated on a panel called “Big Shoes: New Directions at Old Magazines,” …

Gerald Maa is a writer, translator, and editor based in Athens, GA.  His poetry and translations have appeared in places such as Poetry, American Poetry Review, and Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China (Copper Canyon, 2011).  His essays have appeared in places such as Criticism, Studies in Romanticism, A Sense of Regard: Essays on Poetry and Race (University of Georgia, 2015), and The Little Magazine in Contemporary America (University of Chicago, 2015).  Work from his practice of activated writing have been performed and mounted in Los Angeles, New York, and Sweden.  In 2010, he founded The Asian American Literary Review with Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, where he served as editor-in-chief until starting his job at The Georgia Review in August 2019.

 

To Our Readers

14 August 2020

Print can seem like a slow medium these days. In the last issue, I started my note to the reader admitting that I—we, I could safely generalize—did not know what the pandemic would look like when the …

Gerald Maa is a writer, translator, and editor based in Athens, GA.  His poetry and translations have appeared in places such as Poetry, American Poetry Review, and Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China (Copper Canyon, 2011).  His essays have appeared in places such as Criticism, Studies in Romanticism, A Sense of Regard: Essays on Poetry and Race (University of Georgia, 2015), and The Little Magazine in Contemporary America (University of Chicago, 2015).  Work from his practice of activated writing have been performed and mounted in Los Angeles, New York, and Sweden.  In 2010, he founded The Asian American Literary Review with Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, where he served as editor-in-chief until starting his job at The Georgia Review in August 2019.

 

on The Journey by Miguel Collazo, translated by David Frye, with an introduction by Yoss

Miguel Collazo’s puzzling, spasmodic novel The Journey (1968) is a multigenerational tale of hapless inhabitants persisting on a strange planet. The novel hopscotches across hundreds of years, yet carries inside it relics of its origins in post-revolutionary Cuba. While this …

Diego Báez is a writer, educator, and abolitionist. He is the recipient of fellowships from CantoMundo, the Surge Institute, and the Incubator for Community Engaged Poets at the Poetry Foundation. He writes regularly for Booklist, and his poetry and other reviews have appeared in The Acentos Review, The Rumpus, and The Los Angeles Review. He serves on the boards of the National Book Critics Circle and the International David Foster Wallace Society. He lives in Chicago and teaches at the City Colleges.