Phenomenal Listening: The Art of Jason Moran

Then Creole stepped forward [on the bass] to remind them that what they were playing was the blues. . . . He began to tell us what the blues were all about. They were not about anything very new. He …

Radiclani Clytus works at the intersection of new media and nineteenth-century American literature and visual culture.

Picture the Dream: The Story of the Civil Rights Movement through Children’s Books, 15 August–8 November 2020, The High Museum of Art, Atlanta (featuring an interview with Andrea Davis Pinkney)

15 August–8 November 2020, The High Museum of Art, Atlanta

INTRODUCTION

Since spring, the coronavirus pandemic has forced art museums and galleries across the country to halt their programming, and while many have reopened, many would-be patrons remain unable to …

C. J. Bartunek received her PhD in English from the University of Georgia and her BA from the University of Southern California. Her writing has appeared in The Smart SetPacific StandardThe Big Roundtable, and elsewhere. 

Each of Us Chimera

Soon after he came home to Arkansas,
mother’s cousin Larry became a stone on a hill.
She tells of the monkey leashed

and taught to ride his shoulder
as he walked the couple blocks to Main
when they were young, …

Tobias Wray’s debut poetry collection, No Doubt I Will Return a Different Man (Cleveland State University Press, 2021), was selected by Randall Mann for the Lighthouse Poetry Prize. His work has found homes in various literary journals, including Blackbird, Bellingham Review, Meridian, Third Coast, and Hunger Mountain. Some poems also appear in the forthcoming The Queer Nature Anthology (Autumn House Press, 2021) and The Queer Movement Anthology of Literatures (Seagull Books, 2021). He directs the creative writing programs at the University of Idaho on the Palouse, where he lives with his hiking partner, Andy.

Chorus of Raids at Night; Chorus of Battles at Dawn; Chorus of Peace at Dusk; Chorus of Shame at Midnight; & To-Do List Theater Nurse

Stacy Nathaniel Jackson was born in Los Angeles and attended Ramona Convent College Preparatory School for Girls in a former incarnation of his life. He is a Cave Canem fellow and received an individual artist’s grant from the San Francisco Arts Commission in 2011. Author of the chapbook Camouflage (MaCaHu Press, 2010), he has published poems, plays, and visual art in Black Arts Quarterly, Lodestar Quarterly, Enizagam, Poets 11 Anthology, New American Writing 25, and elsewhere.

It’s Like This I Told the Archangel; Fabulous Outrageous Termite Mounds; & Trees Line the Road Into

 

It’s        Like This     I Told the Archangel

                                                                     who can’t swim—

crazy     crowded     under great waters

two hours from shore and so misleading   dull vast gray    not even blue if you 

look from the boat   a great nothing really      except …

Marianne Boruch’s ten poetry collections include the recent title The Anti-Grief (Copper Canyon Press, 2019). She was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Australia last year at the University of Canberra’s International Poetry Studies Institute, observing the astonishing wildlife to write a book-length sequence, a neo-ancient/medieval bestiary, which is forthcoming from Copper Canyon. The poems in this issue are a part of that collection.

[the unguent list] & [kindergarten emergency tap-root tableaux]

Wayne Koestenbaum—poet, essayist, artist, performer—has published twenty books, including, most recently, Figure It Out (Soft Skull, 2020) and Camp Marmalade (Nightboat Books, 2020). His next book, a collection of short fiction, The Cheerful Scapegoat, will be published by Semiotext(e) in April 2021.

a list of things we could do tonight to avoid studying for our final exams & self-portrait

Alejandro Pérez is a student at Columbia University in New York. He is a 2019 Pushcart Prize nominee whose poems have appeared or are forthcoming in the Missouri Review, Boulevard, Passages North, DIAGRAM, and Spanish-language magazines in Venezuela, Chile, and Spain.

Goberkli Tepe; The App; Upanishad, 2019 a.d.; & Babel

Bino A. Realuyo’s The Gods We Worship Live Next Door (University of Utah Press, 2006) was the winner of the Agha Shahid Ali Prize for Poetry. He has published poems in The Nation, the Kenyon Review, The Literary Review, Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, and recent issues of ZYZZYVA, North American Review, The Common, Another Chicago Magazine, Salamander, and New American Writing. His poems in this issue are from his completed manuscript “#TheRebelSonnets.” In December 2019, the band U2 featured his poem in its Joshua Tree Anniversary Concert Tour in Manila. He lives in New York City, where he is an adult educator and immigrant rights activist and the co-founder of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop.

Elegy for the Mall; Peking Garden; & Not Dogs

Adrienne Su’s fifth collection of poems, Peach State, is forthcoming from the University of Pittsburgh Press in spring 2021. Her previous books include Living Quarters (2015), Having None of It (2009), and Sanctuary (2006), all from Manic D Press, and Middle Kingdom (1997), with Alice James Books. Recent poems appear in 32 Poems, Bennington Review, the Cincinnati Review, The New Yorker, and Poem-a-Day. A recipient of grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Money for Women/ Barbara Deming Fund, she is professor of creative writing and Poet-in-Residence at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania.