About

About

The Georgia Review is committed to the art of editorial practice. We collaborate equally with established and emerging authors of essays, stories, poems, and reviews in the pursuit of extraordinary works that engage with the evolving concerns and interests of intellectually curious readers from around the world. Our aim in curating content is not only to elevate literature, publishing, and the arts, but also to help facilitate socially conscious partnerships in our surrounding communities.

 

Laureates

An Olympic Gathering: The Nobel Laureates of Literature, 1995. Left to right, seated: Claude Simon (France, 1985); Rita Dove, former U.S. Poet Laureate; Wole Soyinka (Nigeria, 1986). Left to right, standing: Octavio Paz (Mexico, 1990); Kenzaburo Oe (Japan, 1994); Derek Walcott (Trinidad, 1992); former U.S. President Jimmy Carter; Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games President Billy Payne; former First Lady Rosalyn Carter; Ted Koppel, moderator; Joseph Brodsky (Russia, 1987); Czeslaw Milosz (Poland, 1980).

A Brief History

The Georgia Review—the University of Georgia’s journal of arts and letters—grew out of discussions in 1944 between John Donald Wade, then chair of the English Department, and Harmon Caldwell, the school’s president, as a solution to the “sad and swift submergence” of college graduates’ “intellectual vitality,” as Wade put it, especially in Georgia. The Review’s first issue, published in 1947, announced a magazine “turning on subjects of special interest to Georgians, and all, as nearly as feasible, written by Georgians or people associated with Georgia,” but the once regional journal broadened its reach over the decades to come.

For a brief period in the mid-1970s, The Georgia Review became an academic journal that cultural critic Edward Said described in 1975 as “essential … for anyone interested in the very best vanguard work being done in literature and matters of general intellectual import.” With the Spring 1978 issue, however, an entirely new Review appeared, which contained the first indications of what would continue as its essential approach and format: an art portfolio, a full color cover featuring a previously unreproduced painting by André Derain, a variety of cross-disciplinary essay topics including painting and film, work from established authors joined by two debut writers—including the first African American author to appear in the Review’s pages: Marilyn Nelson Waniek.

Harry Crews and Raymond Andrews, 1985. Photo by Ashton Graham.

Harry Crews and Raymond Andrews, 1985. Photo by Ashton Graham.

Since then The Georgia Review has continued to garner significant acclaim: few other journals have had so many works reprinted in the Pushcart Prize: Best of the Small Presses annual, and twice the magazine has taken a top prize in the annual National Magazine Awards competition, winning out over the likes of the Atlantic, Esquire, the New Yorker, and Vanity Fair, and has been a finalist twenty times in various categories—including General Excellence. To date, The Georgia Review’s roster of authors includes such past and present luminaries as Donald Barthelme, Jericho Brown, Harry Crews, Rita Dove, Stephen Dunn, William Faulkner, Robert Frost, Maxine Kumin, Barry Lopez, Philip Levine, Joyce Carol Oates, Sharon Olds, Mary Oliver, Anne Sexton, Robert Louis Stevenson, Natasha Trethewey, and Derek Walcott, and the journal has featured art portfolios from Jane Alexander, Vanessa German, Titus Kaphar, Farrah Karapetian, Kara Walker, and Masao Yamamoto.