To Our Readers

January 2021

And thus begins our seventh-fifth number.

Seventy-five is certainly a milestone, but I have learned much from Grandma Huang about age. It was a blessing to live within driving distance of my maternal grandmother during the first few …

Gerald Maa is a writer, translator, and editor based in Athens, GA.  His poetry and translations have appeared in places such as Poetry, American Poetry Review, and Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China (Copper Canyon, 2011).  His essays have appeared in places such as Criticism, Studies in Romanticism, A Sense of Regard: Essays on Poetry and Race (University of Georgia, 2015), and The Little Magazine in Contemporary America (University of Chicago, 2015).  Work from his practice of activated writing have been performed and mounted in Los Angeles, New York, and Sweden.  In 2010, he founded The Asian American Literary Review with Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, where he served as editor-in-chief until starting his job at The Georgia Review in August 2019.

 

To Our Readers

7 October 2020

During last year’s annual conference for the Association of Writers and Writing Programs, more commonly known as AWP (where did the other “W” go?), I participated on a panel called “Big Shoes: New Directions at Old Magazines,” …

Gerald Maa is a writer, translator, and editor based in Athens, GA.  His poetry and translations have appeared in places such as Poetry, American Poetry Review, and Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China (Copper Canyon, 2011).  His essays have appeared in places such as Criticism, Studies in Romanticism, A Sense of Regard: Essays on Poetry and Race (University of Georgia, 2015), and The Little Magazine in Contemporary America (University of Chicago, 2015).  Work from his practice of activated writing have been performed and mounted in Los Angeles, New York, and Sweden.  In 2010, he founded The Asian American Literary Review with Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, where he served as editor-in-chief until starting his job at The Georgia Review in August 2019.

 

To Our Readers

14 August 2020

Print can seem like a slow medium these days. In the last issue, I started my note to the reader admitting that I—we, I could safely generalize—did not know what the pandemic would look like when the …

Gerald Maa is a writer, translator, and editor based in Athens, GA.  His poetry and translations have appeared in places such as Poetry, American Poetry Review, and Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China (Copper Canyon, 2011).  His essays have appeared in places such as Criticism, Studies in Romanticism, A Sense of Regard: Essays on Poetry and Race (University of Georgia, 2015), and The Little Magazine in Contemporary America (University of Chicago, 2015).  Work from his practice of activated writing have been performed and mounted in Los Angeles, New York, and Sweden.  In 2010, he founded The Asian American Literary Review with Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, where he served as editor-in-chief until starting his job at The Georgia Review in August 2019.

 

on The Journey by Miguel Collazo, translated by David Frye, with an introduction by Yoss

Miguel Collazo’s puzzling, spasmodic novel The Journey (1968) is a multigenerational tale of hapless inhabitants persisting on a strange planet. The novel hopscotches across hundreds of years, yet carries inside it relics of its origins in post-revolutionary Cuba. While this …

Diego Báez is a writer, educator, and abolitionist. He is the recipient of fellowships from CantoMundo, the Surge Institute, and the Incubator for Community Engaged Poets at the Poetry Foundation. He writes regularly for Booklist, and his poetry and other reviews have appeared in The Acentos Review, The Rumpus, and The Los Angeles Review. He serves on the boards of the National Book Critics Circle and the International David Foster Wallace Society. He lives in Chicago and teaches at the City Colleges.

on The Lying Life of Adults by Elena Ferrante, translated by Ann Goldstein

Elena Ferrante’s new novel, The Lying Life of Adults, is not a book that asks to be liked—at least, not by adults. Adult readers are, after all, just more of those adults who wander through the novel’s pages, telling …

Brianna Beehler, a doctoral candidate in English literature at the University of Southern California, is a 2020–2021 Mellon–Council for European Studies Dissertation Completion Fellow. Her work has recently appeared in Nineteenth-Century Literature and is forthcoming in English Literary History.

Inquiry and Imperative (on Johanna Skibsrud’s The Poetic Imperative: A Speculative Aesthetics and Alice Notley’s For the Ride)

In his 1923 book Spring and All, William Carlos Williams declares that “either to write or to comprehend poetry the words must be recognized to be moving in a direction separate from the jostling or lack of it which …

Julia Bloch is a Pew Fellow in the Arts, editor at Jacket2, and director of the creative writing program at the University of Pennsylvania. Her books of poetry include The Sacramento of Desire (2020), Valley Fever (2015), and Lambda Literary Award finalist Letters to Kelly Clarkson (2012), all published by Sidebrow Press. She is currently writing a scholarly book about race, gender, and lyric in long poems.

Harder and Better: The New Masculinity of Fatherhood Poetry (on Douglas Kearney’s Patter; Oliver de la Paz’s The Boy in the Labyrinth; Craig Morgan Teicher’s The Trembling Answers; and Niall Campbell’s Noctuary)

 

 

 

 

 

In a decade of reading and writing about motherhood poetry—including an essay-review in these pages in 2019—I have found no universal truths about motherhood. However, as I’ve worked with poet Nancy Reddy to edit an …

Emily Pérez is the co-editor of the forthcoming anthology The Long Devotion: Poets Writing Motherhood (University of Georgia Press, 2021) and the author of the poetry collections Made and Unmade (Madhouse Press, 2019), House of Sugar, House of Stone (Center for Literary Publishing, 2016), and Backyard Migration Route (Finishing Line Press, 2011). A CantoMundo fellow and Ledbury Emerging Critic, her poems and reviews have appeared in journals including Cosmonauts Avenue, Copper Nickel, Poetry, Diode, RHINO, and The Guardian. She teaches English and gender studies in Denver, where she lives with her family.

Psittaciformes Forms, Self-Eating Forms

INTRODUCTION

Yaron Michael Hakim has been painting at the limits of human possibility. Across two large bodies of work, Anthropophagy (2016–17) and Psittaciformes (2017–present), Hakim has used the titular figures, the cannibal and the parrot, respectively, to undertake these tremendous …

Yaron Michael Hakim (b. 1980 Bogotá, Colombia) lives and works in Los Angeles. He has exhibited in Europe and the United States and recently had solo exhibitions at Hernando’s Hideaway in Miami and LAXART, Los Angeles. He has been included in group shows at The Pit, BBQLA, and The Box in Los Angeles and at Art+Château in Ladoix-Serrigny, France.

Song of Suburbia; The Couple; & On Three Hours Sleep

Patrick Phillips’s first book of nonfiction, Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America (Norton, 2016), was named a best book of the year by the New York Times, the Boston Globe, and Smithsonian. He is also the author of three poetry collections, including Elegy for a Broken Machine (Knopf, 2015), which was a finalist for the National Book Award. Phillips teaches writing and literature at Stanford University.